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New Sites Abandoned by Googlebot

Mike Banks Valentine writes this excellent piece on the plight of new websites in their quest to be ranked by Google.



“As a search engine optimization specialist I often optimize existing web pages for small business clients, upload them to the site and see pages re-indexed by Google within a week.

This only happens with existing business sites that have been online for a few years. Google seems to be updating their index as often as every other week at this point and older established sites that are already indexed seem to be re- crawled on that twice a month schedule on a fairly routine basis.

Two clients that hired me for recent work saw their rankings shoot to the top for a newly targeted search phrase in a weekend when I did optimization on a Thursday and they were ranked instantly by Saturday. Now keep in mind that this doesn’t happen for everyone, only those that have been online for some period and already have significant content that simply needs tweaking and proper title and metatag information added. They usually have relatively good existing PageRank and do well for other RELEVANT search phrases already. I offer that warning only to avoid instilling false hopes in anyone hoping to achieve the same instant ranking boost overnight.”

Read more at Sites Abandoned by Googlebot

The Future of Online Advertising

Free Webmoney has posted a great list of resources for people wanting to explore online advertising options. Its a good starting point on a variety of different topics.

How to Make Money from The Blogging Phenomenon

‘Blogging is driven by personal brand: authority and trust. This cannot be manufactured, and cannot be imparted to newbies just by affixing a media brand to them.

Blogging will change everything it touches: classified, the blurring of oped and so-called factual journalism, and the duality between advertisers as content and context.

Blogging is technology driven, and we are not done yet. There are serious fortunes to be made by brining together the right tech mix into new products. In particular, the integration of social tools — instant messaging, streaming content, and the like — with blogging.

The media companies are losing their control of the media markets, and knowledgeable and erudite bloggers are being able to directly influence market behavior. This transition will accelerate, and then the media business will reformulate itself around the new paradigm.’

Read More at Business Blogs for Business Applications: How to Make Money from The Blogging Phenomenon

Product Blogs

Peter Davidson has a post worth reading titled Thinking About Product Blogs.

‘Many product blogs(PB) and small biz blogs(SBB) fail to define narrowly enough their audience and what they want to accomplish with their blog. Are you writing for existing customers or prospective customers? Both is the common answer. I would say this is a problem since the interests and information needs of these two groups are very different. For example: many SBBs and PBs post every media or prominent blogger mention they get. While this may be useful to people seeking additional information about your product it is not very useful to existing product owners. Do I really want to read all the press clippings about a product I already own. Press mentions should be compiled in a sidebar or miniblog.’

Read more of Thinking About Product Blogs.

Blogging for Beginners

I’ve been asked to submit a very short piece into a magazine with some basic tips for beginner bloggers which I thought I’d share here. They are not Rocket Science – pretty basic – but a good starting point for someone starting out in Blogging.

- Keep it simple. Start with a free and easy to use blogging tool like Blogger. Pick a simple design and just start writing. You can tweak the design and make it look good later.
[Read more...]

Three kinds of blogs – Which are best Suited to Making Money?

Seth’s Godin has an interesting post unpacking three types of blogs.

He classifies them as:

1. News Blogs – Chronicling the News of the day on a variety of topics from Politics to Gadgetry to Recipies.

2. Writers Blogs – Where a writer rants, raves, monologues, writes – generally original content inspired by life, readers questions, others thoughts.

3. Our Blogs – Community centred blogs where posts stimulate discussion – its less about one blogger’s ideas but about a communal learning/discussion/discovery etc.

Of course some blogs attempt to sit between two of these categories – or emerge from one into another over time.

Thinking about Revenue Streams – how does this apply to commercial opportunities? –

News Blogs – most of the blogs out there that seem to be attempting to generate revenue directly seem to fit into the ‘News Blog’ type category. For example consider Gizmodo which points to and announces new technological gadgets. There are hundreds of other blogs doing similar things including most of my own ventures.

Some Writers blogs are big and popular enough to generate some income but in my experience it is pretty hard to do so as the advertising pool can be a little limited. Some of the blogs that I’d say fit into this cateogory who run ads include Instapundit and Andrew Sullivan.

Our Blogs‘ I see as a bit of an untapped area in terms of the commercial nature. One of the things I’ve noticed about some ‘Our Blogs’ is that they generate ALOT of repeat traffic. People come back to them to interact, leave comments, lurk, debate – this is an idea situation for impression based ads programs like Fastclick. In my experience these community type blogs don’t tend to do well on programs that rely on clicks as much because those using the blogs become a little blind to the ads – but impression based ads are another story. One of the blogs that I’ve seen that is very successful in its community focus work is Idol Blog.

Read more of Seth’s thinking at Three kinds of blogs

FindWhat – AdRevenue Xpress

FindWhat has just started their own advertising system similar to that of Google’s Adsense program. Clickz.com has the story and writes:

‘FindWhat.com today debuted AdRevenue Xpress, an automated distribution partner program targeting small to mid-sized businesses. The distribution method is similar to Google’s AdSense, but it uses category- or keyword-targeting, rather than contextual targeting.

The program allows smaller partners, through a step-by-step set up process, to add a search box which returns ads from the FindWhat.com Network. Alternatively, publishers who want to display ads on their site directly, rather than via a search results page, can choose a FindWhat category and display ads from that category.’

So the ads served by this system are not contextually based (so you might be able to run them along side Adsense ads if they look sufficiently different to Adsense format ads). The other difference in the program is that AdRevenue Xpress gives publishers the options to put their earnings back into the system to advertise their own sites – with a 10% discount! This is an attractive feature and something I’ve often wished I could do with Adsense. It will be an interesting system to watch and I’d be very interested to hear from anyone out there who decides to give the AdRevenue Xpress system a go.

Have Blog, Will Market – Business Blogs

Just found this interesting article on Business Blogging.



“Jonathan Schwartz is a blogging addict. He is also the president and chief operating officer of
Sun Microsystems (SUNW) — a company at the forefront of a new marketing and communications trend that mixes blogging with business. (For the rapidly shrinking minority who don’t know what I’m talking about, a weblog — or blog — is a personal journal on the Web that’s devoted to politics, science, product reviews, or just about anything else you can imagine.) In his corporate blog, Schwartz, naturally, covers the world of Sun. In his latest entry, which focuses on a trip he took last week to Wall Street, he juxtaposes snippets of his Manhattan dinner conversations with Sun’s recent work on “radical form factor compression.”

The Sun president’s Web writing style — open, honest, ever geeky — is a hit. Schwartz’s blog reaches more than 100,000 readers per month, a number that has grown exponentially during the blog’s three-month existence. “I’m stunned by the breadth of it,” he says. Surprise aside, it’s easy to see why a busy bigwig like Schwartz might take the time to operate what some view as a nerdish hobby. “It is an efficient way for me to have a focused, one-on-one conversation with thousands of people — shareholders, customers, employees, and the digerati that circle this industry,” Schwartz explains….

In theory, at least, blogs are a marketer’s dream. That’s because — unlike burning through millions of dollars on TV or print advertising campaigns — they are a virtually cost-free way to communicate with customers. And not just any customers. These are self-selected hard-core fans of a particular trend, hobby, idea, or product. “Bloggers are an incredibly influential consumer segment,” says Technorati CEO David Sifry. “These people are huge networkers. They get the word out quickly on products they like — and don’t like.” Exploiting these chatty surfers is especially useful during a product launch. (To help create consumer buzz for its newest film, for example, Fox Searchlight is running a Garden State blog penned by actor/director/writer Zach Braff.) The chief blog marketing goal, then: Create a community of knowledgeable insiders. “Done right, consumers will do all the marketing for the company — forwarding the information they found to their friend and encouraging others to visit,” says Lydia Snape, Internet services director for New York agency Renegade Marketing.”

Read more at Have Blog, Will Market:

Product and Brand Names are Best Keywords

The Daily Rundown (link removed as the site is no longer there)has this interesting piece of analysis about what people are searching for on Google.

‘ 28% of Google searches are for a “product name”, 9% are for a “brand name” and 5% are searches for a “company name”. “Brand” keywords also have a 8x higher ROI than generic keywords. Not sure if that is for all searches or just consumer-product related searches, but either way it demonstrates the importance of making sure your site shows up on the SERPs for your brand.’

Now that is some useful information that fits pretty well with the anecdotal evidence that I’ve seen over the past year. So if you’re reviewing, previewing or just talking about a product you should be as specific as possible with your keywords – put them in your title, in your image tags, and make sure they’re included numerous times in the body of your post.

Search Engine Optimization FAQs

SEO – Seven Most Often Asked Questions is a good article with some FAQs that people often ask about Search Engine Optimization complete with answers that should help anyone wanting to optimize their sites for Search Engines. The first FAQ is:

‘Please help! My website has been banned! I cannot find it anywhere in Google or even in AltaVista for that matter. Since 3 years now, I have been following all the great advice you give in your newsletter and on your website. I’ve always been number 3 or 4 on the first SERP of Google, but now I just cannot find my site anywhere! What should I do? ‘