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Fastclick Reviewed – Advertising suitable for high traffic Blogs



Fastclick
is a revenue stream that will be suitable for some highly trafficked blogs. We trailed it recently on our Olympics blog and found that with the levels of traffic that we generated at the height of the games that it out performed all other revenue streams on the site including Google.

They offer a range of ads – mainly paying on a per impression basis. Pay outs depend on the ad size, style and content but are generally very very small. As a result a blog with only a small amount of visitors would probably find it more hassle than its worth to register and run with.
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More detailed Adsense Statistics

Adsense Tracker is one of the most useful tools that any Adsense user could invest in. As the name suggests Adsense Tracker gives you statistics that Adsense does not even come close to giving you in their statistics/reporting package.

Track Click Throughs from Each Page – For example – have you ever wondered which pages on your blog are providing the click-throughs? Adsense only lets you track 50 channels – most of of us track categories but Adsense Tracker lets you track every page on your blog!

Now in my mind that is information that I’d pay for. Think about it. You’ve got 1000 pages on your blog. The clicks could be coming evenly from them all – or they could be coming predominantly from one or two pages. Wouldn’t it be useful to know which pages they were so that you could:
1. write more posts on those topics (or even start a new blog dedicated to them)
2. promote those pages more
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AdSense Per Click Payout Based On Natural Rankings

Interesting post over at Digital Point on Read more AdSense Per Click Payout Based On Natural Rankings. The basic question – does Google rankings for keywords have an impact on the rate at which ads on those keywords pay out at? The thread starts with this:

‘I’ve noticed something interesting with pretty much every site I run AdSense on. The better it ranks for it’s main keywords (which is what AdSense would be based on) in a natural search in Google, the higher the AdWords cost (and AdSense per click payout).

One site ranked around #25 in the SERPs for it’s keywords. AdSense paid roughly $0.10 per click. As it slowly moved up in natural rankings, so did the AdSense per click payout, until now it’s top 5 and it gets $1.50 per click on average (nothing else has changed).

Conversely, I have a site that did rank top 5 for something, and it was getting about $1.20 for AdSense. The rankings have dropped, and the AdSense per click payout mirrored that drop (now it’s averages $0.02 per click).’

TypePad Blogs to get Contextual Advertising

Kanoodle and Six Apart (makers of Typepad and Moveable Type blogging systems) are partnering together to offer Typepad bloggers the opportunity to run contextual ads to their site – and thereby add a revenue stream to their blogs. This is similar to what Blogger blogs can do with Adsense – however it seems that this new system will be a little more seamless and integrated into the Typepad blogs. It will be interesting to see how many TypePad bloggers utilise the system due to go live in the first quarter of next year. For more information see the following press relase.

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Ways to promote your Blog

Boston.com has a good article on ways to promote your weblog called Don’t let your blog get lost in the fog.

They write – ‘But even good blogs can go unread, without a little extra effort to attract visitors.

What’s needed are some eyeball magnets — blogging tools that will bring new traffic to your site. And there are plenty to choose from.

Syndication, for one. That’s the popular practice of adding a tag to your blog that will automatically let readers know when you’ve added material.

On many popular blogs, you’ll see a link marked RSS, XML, or Atom. Plug that link into a syndication software program, and you’ll get an update every time the website is updated. Most avid blog readers use syndication programs to keep tabs on their favorite sites. Adding syndication to your own blog can deliver a quick boost in readership.

The leading blog-hosting companies, like Google Inc.’s Blogger, provide syndication; it’s just a matter of switching it on and adding a bit of extra code to your blog. If you’re serious about expanding your audience, it’s the first move to make.’

Google traffic vs Slashdot traffic – Which would you prefer?

Have you ever been Slashdotted?

It sounds painful doesn’t it – but its actually quite fun. Being Slashdotted basically means that you’re linked to by the mega-blog – Slashdot. The cool thing about the experience is that if you chance upon being mentioned on Slashdot that you are about to have a deluge of traffic.

This morning I awoke to find that one of my new blogs had been mentioned in a post – just 6 hours after it was linked to the blog had had over 25,000 unique visitors. Pretty cool stuff – I mean traffic is the key to making a fortune online isn’t it?

Does 1000 times the traffic = 1000 times the income??

Wrong – Buzzz – Please Try Again….
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Making Money from Blogs – BloggerCon III

I wish I were able to get to BloggerCon III – the Making Money session sounds particularly interesting as reported on PaidContent.org. Here are a few of the quotes that they quote that I find of most interest:

– “One sure way to make money — provide infrastructure to people like me.”
– to make money from Google, “try to be as small and niche-like as possible.”
– Dave Winer wants to know why we’re talking about nickels and dimes instead of the real money that can be made by creating business because of your blog, with people you meet through the blog, with ideas that bubble up through the blog? He says he flips hundreds of thousands of dollars through his blog.
– An author says he can make twice as much referring his book through Amazon then from the royalty.
– “If you want to make money from blogging maybe it’s not your personal blog that’s going to do it.”

Read more at PaidContent.org’s coverage of BloggerCon III

update – a few of other bloggers are also covering this session at:
- RConversation
- Roland Tanglao’s Weblog
- John Furrier

Ad Networks for your Blog

I was just reading a thread over at SitePoint Forums on where someone ask which is the Best Ad Network?

Someone answered with this list which I found really helpful. I’ve filled in the links of some of those mentioned.

Tier 1: Tribal Fusion, Fast Click, Burst, 24/7 Real Media
Tier 2: Casale, RealTechNetwork, Max Online, RightMedia, Rydium

Tier 3: BUDS, JoeTec, RealCastMedia, GorillaNation, ValueClick

Tier 4: FocusIN, EzzPublishers, BannerSpace, ClickXchange, Adtegrity, BraveNet, Undertone Network

Tier 5: ValueAd, CompactBanner, Adinfinity (same company), ClixGalore

They write in explaining the list – ‘based on rates, difficulty of becoming accepted, and quality of advertisements. Tiers 1 – 3 are, overall, good ad networks. Anything below three either means their ad quality, ease of entrance into their network, or questionable business in the past is in question.’



What ad providers have you tried? What additions or changes would you add to the above list?

Lessons Learned: AdSense

‘Brainy Betty’ over at the Adsense forum at Webmaster World has started a good thread on Lessons Learned with Adsense. She writes:



‘A year and a half later with AdSense and still going strong – here are my lessons learned: (What are yours?)

1. Graphic design: Provide clean pages and lots of them with a simple, 1 color (non-tiled, generally) background

2. Meta Tags: Use them! Make sure you don’t have 90 bijillion keywords. The fewer and more targeted the better. Put the title tag up on top first.

3. Content: Provide useful, necessary content. Get feedback from your visitors to find out what they are looking for; what they want, and create pages accordingly. The more descriptive text on each individual page, the better.

4. Ad Settings: Change them about once a month or so. Make large banners smaller; use verticals in some places, definitely change colors so people notice – especially repeat visitors who have ‘turned off’ the ads in their heads if they see them in the same place with the same colors and formats all the time…’

Read more from Betty and others at Lessons Learned: AdSense

Unique Titles for Each Page of your Blog

Good post over at Search Engine Roundtable on the importance Unique Titles for Each Page of your Site (Blog). I can’t agree with the post more – I have all my blogs set up this way (ie the title of my post becomes the title of my page) and noticed a huge difference in search engine referrals a few days after I made the change.

Some blogging systems are set up this way by default, but most require you to specify it and manually set it up this way. Also important is having your key words in the URL of your page. I incorporate the title (and therefore the keywords of my post) in my URLs and again noticed an increase in traffic after making this change a year or so back. Here’s an excerpt from the post mentioned above.



‘Each page should have a unique title – one that will attract clicks.

A title consisting of keywords separated by commas may not be the most appealing to surfers – it’s the title that appears as the clickable link in the SERPs. So make it about 8-9 words or less, including the main keyword phrase for the page and also a word or two that’s a variation or additional modifier, to target a little wider variety of phrases.’



Read more at Unique Titles for Each Web Page

update – also check out Permalinks, Key Feature Number One which is a post on the same topic that is well worth the read.