How to Use Blab Live Streaming to Grow Your Blog


NewImage.pngIn today’s episode of the ProBlogger podcast, I am talking about a new tool for bloggers and content creators that I’ve really taken to: Blab. It’s kind of like the lovechild of Google Hangouts and Periscope, and I’ve been experimenting with it a lot lately.

When I first heard of Blab I was sceptical, but over the next few days I noticed quite a few people I respect were using it, so I checked it out properly. It was broadcasting the speaker, much like other apps, but I quickly realised it solved a problem that I’d been having with Periscope – it was too much centred on me, and Blab meant I could have greater interaction with the people watching and listening, which was a much more two-way conversation.

In episode 44, I describe how Blab not only has been useful for me, but also how I think it can be useful to you to help grow your blog – from deepening relationships with your audience, getting ideas from chat and Q&A sessions, the ease of sharing Blab content, replays, continuation of videos, repurposing blog posts or posts you’ve written elsewhere, to the benefits of being able to interact in real time, whether it’s a keynote-style presentation or a more relaxed conversation.

I talk about how I use Blab, the basics of getting started, how I learned best practice, and tips to help you on your live streaming journey.

You can find episode 44 of the ProBlogger podcast: How to Use Blab Live Streaming to Grow Your Blog here, along with show notes and extra links.

You can also follow me on Blab here, and be notified of future broadcasts.

Are you on Blab? Leave a link to your profile in the comments.

Further Reading:

Can Launching a “For Beginners” Blog Still Work?

Can Launching a "For Beginners" Blog Still Work?This is a guest contribution from Karol K.

Here’s the thing. One of the prevailing myths around blogging is that the best way to start a new blog is to find a topic you’re passionate about, and then build a blog targeting a general, beginner audience interested in it.

For example, if your passion is WordPress then a (seemingly) good idea for a blog is something like “Beginner’s Guide to WordPress.”

Well, here’s the kicker … even though it might sound like a good idea, it actually isn’t.

In theory, you should be able to attract beginners and effectively be the first resource they encounter. But in practice, most of your readers will already be familiar with some of the big-name blogs in your niche by the time they even get to yours.

Those big-name blogs have all the power they need to sweep your target audience right from under your nose. They have the reputation, they have the brand and they have the social proof that beginners look for.

So what to do?

Is the “beginners” market so saturated that there’s no place left for you? Should you just abandon the idea of blogging entirely?

In a sentence: Of course not!

Let’s look into the possibilities that are still out there, and the specific things to do if you want to get into blogging.

Fork in the road – three paths to blogging

Taking the problem described above into account, there are basically three paths you can follow:

  • Launch a “for beginners” blog anyway. Hey, it will be difficult, but it’s not impossible, provided you have these two things: (1) a big budget to spend on promotion, SEO and other marketing-related things, or (2) a truly unique angle that has the potential to stick right from the get-go.
  • Launch a blog in a specialized area within the “beginners” niche. Using my previous example, a specialized area in “Beginner’s Guide to WordPress” might be a “Designer’s Guide to WordPress” – exactly what CodeinWP did when launching their blog meant for WordPress enthusiasts and pros.
  • Launch a blog focusing on more advanced aspects of the niche. Here, you’ll be going the completely opposite way and not paying much attention to beginner topics.

All of the above have their pros and cons, so let’s go over each and get a little more in-depth here.

“For beginners” blog

The main advantage of launching a “for beginners” blog is that creating content shouldn’t be very challenging. I mean, I know that bloggers have to be able to provide quality no matter who they’re writing for, but creating beginner content is always … what’s the word … lighter than creating advanced content.

It’s also easier to explain the purpose of your blog and probably convey its brand too.

Moreover, beginner blogs can usually utilize different content types more effectively than advanced blogs. For instance, it’s way easier to conduct an interview with a respected figure in the niche and prepare a list of questions that everyone can benefit from (not only advanced listeners).

On the other hand, the main downside is that making such a blog popular is next to impossible. Okay, maybe I’m a little too harsh, but let’s not forget that only a small part of blogs manage to attract more than 200 visitors a day, and the more competition you have, the more difficult it gets.

In order to grow such a blog, you’ll have to invest not only in good SEO, active social media promotions, massive guest blogging, but also in promotion through other online media channels like YouTube or podcasting.

Specialized “for beginners” blog

Launching a specialized “for beginners” blog shouldn’t be much more difficult than launching a standard one; although creating regular content can be a bit more challenging and will require more time.

However, one of the great things about such sites is that they become somewhat authoritative by default right from day one. For instance, if you title your blog “The Beginner’s Guide to Grilling Steak” then very few people will question your expertise in that space. It’s much more difficult to portray yourself as an expert in “all things cooking,” than it is in “all things grilling steak.” The same thing goes for most other niches too.

For example, this approach was neatly used by Ruben Gamez of Bidsketch when he launched a blog to get more people interested in his main product – project proposal software for freelancers. The main idea of the blog was to focus on topics related to project proposals and working with clients.

Such a strategy has made it easier to get the initial stream of visitors and build a core audience. In comparison, launching and growing a blog that simply talks about marketing or business would have been much more difficult.

Essentially, the more niche you go, the easier it is to find a small group of devoted fans. That being said, the problem you might encounter sooner or later is that building your audience can gradually become more challenging every month. You can simply start running out of audience, so to speak.

What to do when that starts to happen? Pivot. Start writing about other more general topics related to your niche. Your core audience will help you spread the word and reach new readers. Readers who would have never stumbled upon you otherwise.

Good SEO and other promotional methods are still important when growing a specialized niche blog (like they always are). So you will need to devote significant amount of your time to that. On the bright side, your hyper-niche idea is most likely to stick right away and resonate with a targeted visitor who’s actively interested in the topic.

Advanced niche blog

A good way to get a grasp on what an advanced blog should cover is to think about one of your passions and try answering the following question:

What were the things you were interested in once you were already 2 to 3 years into your passion? In most cases, this is the kind of topics that are perfect for an advanced blog.

Nevertheless, an advanced blog is probably the most challenging project to launch successfully from a content creator’s point of view. Advanced content is always the most time-consuming type of writing, and it needs to be 100 percent accurate with no room for mistakes (advanced audiences will quickly catch those).

Thankfully, you don’t have to publish new posts very often. Even once a week or once every other week will do just fine, as long as your content is extremely useful.

Just like with the other two types of blogs described here, good SEO is always the key ingredient. Luckily, the keywords for an advanced blog are usually less competitive and easier to target. Most of them are long tail keywords.

For example, two or three weeks ago I wanted to get some info on creating a grandchild theme in WordPress. The phrase I used in Google was something like “how to create a child theme of a child theme WordPress” … this is what we call long tail.

The greatest power of long tail keyword phrases is that when someone searches using them, they are almost 100 percent certain to visit your page if the title (more or less) matches their search query. Going long tail, as a searcher, is the ultimate desperate move. It simply means that you haven’t been able to find quality information with shorter queries.

One more cool thing is that the big and popular blogs in your niche are more likely to link to a blog that covers advanced topics. That’s because you’re positioning yourself as the “next step up” kind of resource. Comparing this to a scenario where you have yet another “for beginners” blog, there’s just no need for an already established popular “for beginners” blog to link to it.

Taking action

All three types of blogs have their individual challenges and pros and cons to tackle. But in the end, launching a successful blog is always a lot of work. I’m sure you’re familiar with Darren’s story on how he built his blogs.

Every project like this should start with a good plan. I hope that this post will help you craft such a plan and then put it in practice.

Lastly, what’s your opinion about blogging in “for beginners” niches? Does it still make sense to do it?

Karol K. (@carlosinho) is a freelance blogger and writer, published author, and online business figure-outer. His work has been featured all over the web, on sites like:,,,,,, and others. Feel free to contact him to find out how he can help your business grow by writing unique and engaging content for your blog or website.

How She Does it: Blogger Pip Lincolne Talks Finding Time to Write Books

How She Does it Blogger Pip Lincolne Talks Finding Time to Write Books on

As Darren said a little while ago, everybody has a book in them, but it’s probably more accurate to say every blogger has at least 10 ideas for eBooks inside them. If you’re a writer, you’ve got a lot to say. You might want to write eBooks, print books, memoirs, autobiographies – a thousand ideas, but realistically not a lot of time in your schedule for your one (or many!) overarching grand plan.

You may well set aside 15 minutes every day to chip away at it, or you schedule some vacation time and get a chunk done. You might stop blogging over a certain period, or you could burn the candle at both ends… the choice always depends on the person making it.

I was given a fantastic piece of advice lately, and that’s if you want to do something, you don’t find time, you make time. So I asked one of the most prolific bloggers I know how she makes time to do write more involved books in addition to all the other things she does. Pip Lincolne is the author of five published books and is a regular contributor to blogs, websites, and magazines.  She blogs at Meet Me at Mikes, and she graciously asked a few questions I had for her recently.

How do you make writing books fit into your everyday busy life?

I prioritize it. You know how you might insist on having a lunch break every day? (If you can!) I treat writing a book as seriously as having lunch and block out an hour or two each day to get the words down (let’s call that a long lunch, actually!) Some days are busier than others, but I always make sure that I spend at least an hour on the book I’m working on to be sure that I’m on deadline, but also to ensure I stay in the zone and keep things flowing nicely.

Do different styles of books take different times to write?

Well, I can only speak from my own experience here. I’ve written books with lots of craft projects in them, and more recently one with only a few craft project (and a more substantial observational-style writing element.)

The books with more instructional elements take more time, because not only are you ‘translating’ practical steps onto the page, you have to test those steps and rewrite and test again.

Although I got my start in publishing writing how-to type books, I much prefer the creative flow that observational writing offers.

Do you have a particular writing style now after writing so many? Is there a rough formula you follow?

I think I have a very consistent style, but sometimes, if I’m weary I might slip out of that story telling, chatty mode and into more of a documentary style. I much prefer the former and think that our writing uniqueness comes from writing in the same chatty way that we’d speak to a dear friend. Of course, if you are writing a more technical text, that might might not always be appropriate, but I’m lucky enough to be able to stay true to the voice that comes naturally for me.

I don’t really have a formula, but I do try to make sure that my work has clarity, flow and warmth to it. I triple check what I write for ‘sense’ because I often find that the sentences I conclude with often belong at the start of the piece (and things might need a brisk reorder and edit.) Often things write themselves backwards, if that makes sense!

I know you write a lot every day so how do you find the motivation to write extra on top of that?

I think that if you want to write well, you have to write often. I’ve certainly found that my writing has improved in leaps and bounds, not only via writing consistently, but also via reading great books and hearing other writers talk about their work.

I’ve always, always felt compelled to write regularly and prolifically. Apparently I have things to say! My great grandfather, Frank Boreham, was the same. He wrote over 50 books – selling millions of copies – as well as penning hundreds of editorials for The Age and The Mercury newspapers. I think my urge to write is in the genes! I can’t fight it! I thank Frank for that.

What are the lessons you’ve learned about the book-writing process over the years?

I’ve learnt so many things! I’ve always worked with wonderful editors, so I’m all about letting go a bit and letting the experts help me to tighten up and simplify my words. I’ve also been lucky enough to work with several great photographers (John Laurie, Tim James and Julie Renouf) and designers/stylists (Michelle Mackintosh and Ortolan.) They’ve shown me how wonderful the collaborative process can be. I think it’s easy to get hung up on having as much creative control as possible, but it’s very important to loosen up a bit sometimes and let others work their magic alongside your good ideas.

I’ve also learnt that it’s important to NOT wait until the night before your book’s publicity tour begins to read it from cover to cover again – especially if the first interview is breakfast radio – because you might be up half the night marveling at how your book actually isn’t half bad and a bit exhausted the next day! Better to do that first-since-published re-read as soon as it arrives in the post, I think!

I’ve learnt that I work best if I write almost every day. Five days a week, minimum, works well for me. It keeps me writing naturally and stops me from overthinking the words or writing too sentimentally.

What are the shortcuts you’ve figured out over the years?

I’ve got a snazzy shortcut for creating a framework for a book. This is helpful for people who want to try writing a book, but aren’t sure where to start. I used this method to write my most recent book. It goes like this:

  • Choose your subject or storyline.
  • Write ten or twelve MUST KNOW (or MUST DISCUSS) points or plot events to fit that subject or storyline.
  • Turn each of those points or events into a chapter title (they can just be working titles at this stage).
  • Write 1000 or so words on each of those chapters (or slot in writing you have already done where it ‘belongs’, under the relevant point or event).
  • Try to write for at least an hour, five days a week. Just get the words down, however they come out.
  • Re-read, rewrite, edit.
  • Repeat as needed!

What do you do with your blog when you write? Is it kept at the same frequency?

I do keep blogging pretty consistently when I’m writing a book, because the more I write, the easier it is to write. I find that when I don’t have a lot of writing work on, the words come less freely. This is part of why I love Julia Cameron’s writing exercise The Morning Pages (from her book The Artist’s Way.) The Morning Pages set the daily task of writing quite a significant amount, long-hand, just for the sake of writing.

I find it’s a great way to stay in shape during the ‘off season’, so to speak! It encourages me to get whatever is in my head (quite messily) down on the page and has a magical way of loosening up the cogs, making writing much easier and more natural for me. I recommend this method to all my blogging students too.

In short: if you want to write well, write more and write daily.

What about social media? How do you keep on top of that, given you’re a personal blog and you can’t exactly hire people to be “you”?

I tend to use social media for sharing others’ work as much as my own. I use CoSchedule to share my own posts to social media. It’s such a great plugin and I’m a huge fan. You can create your social posts and schedule them from within your WordPress post editing window. I do this when I’m finished writing my post, so it’s part of my editorial workflow rather than a pesky ‘extra step’. Then the plugin does the job for you – sharing to Twitter or Facebook in whichever way you’ve asked it to. So streamlined and simple to use! Elephant stamp in the time-saving department for CoSchedule!

I then make sure I check in and monitor/reply to anyone who’s nice enough to talk to me on Facebook or Twitter. It only takes a few minutes a couple of times a day and it means that followers aren’t just yelling into the void (to quote Grace & Frankie!)

When it comes to sharing great stuff other people are doing, I have all my favourite reads on Feedly so I can enjoy the in one time-saving window. I then share the best of my Feedly reading, loading them up in Buffer with a chatty comment, an image and a tag for the great-stuff-creator where possible. Buffer sends them out to my custom schedule and using Feedly and Buffer together is a great time saver (you can also share directly from within Feedly if you like but I prefer to share on the actual Buffer platform as I like the interface.)

How do you know when to say yes to a book?

I think a great publishing deal comes down to working with good people. If you have a great rapport with a publisher, if they’ve got a great track record, if they’re prepared to give you a bit of room to move (so you can have a bit of creative freedom when you’re writing) and a great royalty then chances are it’s a ‘yes’!

It’s also good to know what marketing and distribution ideas they might have for your book, as well as any design vision they might be considering. Then you can see if everyone’s on the same page (!) and if your book will have the support it needs to stand out from the pack.

I’d definitely go for a great royalty over a big advance if you have to choose. I’ve heard people splash around big advance figures – but you’ve got to earn that money back in book sales. A big advance = big pressure! So look for the best royalty rate you can get. The Australian Society of Authors (ASA) recommends at least 10% – but you may find that as a first time author it will be lower than that.

I’d also do my homework and ask for help – perhaps by engaging a literary agent (because they’re smart when it comes to digital rights and other ever-changing details) and joining the ASA so that you can find out more about what goes into making a great book.


Has it convinced you that you can make some time in your schedule around blogging to finally get started on that book? What are you writing about?

Stacey Roberts is the Managing Editor of a writer, blogger, and full-time word nerd balancing it all with being a stay-at-home mum. She writes about all this and more at Veggie Mama. Chat with her on Twitter @veggie_mama or be entertained on Facebook.

Reading Roundup: What’s New in Blogging Lately

Reading Roundup: What's new in blogging this week /

Your news – this week expanded, as requested! I hope there’s something here that you will find helpful.

6 Tips to Improve Your Facebook Posts // Social Media Examiner

And now I want a bread bowl filled with cheese.

8 Lesser-Known Strategies to Get More out of LinkedIn // Mashable

Have you had much luck with LinkedIn? You might now!

Top 10 Wins for Getting Started Fast with Facebook Video // Buffer

With 300 hours of viewable video posted every minute, you’re going to need to know how to stand out.

Press Publish: Matt Thompson on The Atlantic’s Attempt to Breathe Life into Classic Blogging // NiemanLab

A podcast discussing the current conversation that blogging is going through a period of reinvigoration and what is to become of it. They say “It’s an interesting attempt to recapture some of the looser, voicier, more conversational structures of the early 2000s — some of which has been lost in the rise of social media and commercialized online news.” and I was interested to hear how it’s worked for them.

The Top 1o Ways to Make Money Online with Integrity // Lewis Howes

Do you do any of these? I like how Lewis advises to make money by doing it “the right way that both serves your vision and supports others”. That’s a win-win.

How to Stay Consistent // Chalene Johnson

Probably my worst habit is being inconsistent. I know everything would move a lot smoother if I did it properly, and cultivated good habits. But at least I’m holding myself accountable, which is her second point.

9 Ways to Improve your Pinterest Marketing // Social Media Examiner

I hear number 4 works exceptionally well, and it’s got me thinking about something I’ve been meaning to do for a while now. Number 9 is always good – I just wish I was that clever!

How to Simplify Your Blogging Life with Tsh Oxenreider // The Blog Maven

One of my favourite topics with one of my favourite people. Don’t miss this episode.

How to Self-Publish Your Own Books as a Business Model // By Regina

Don’t wait for publishers to come to you! There’s plenty of information available to help you DIY. This is a great perspective on making it part of your overall monetisation strategy.

The iPhone Will Finally Get a Taco Emoji with iOS 9.1 // Mashable

And all my emoji dreams have come true.


What have you read this week that’s caught your eye? I’d love to hear!

Stacey Roberts is the Managing Editor of a writer, blogger, and full-time word nerd balancing it all with being a stay-at-home mum. She writes about all this and more at Veggie Mama. Chat with her on Twitter @veggie_mama or be entertained on Facebook.

How To Create Great Content For Your Blog – Q&A, Part 2

How To Create Great Content For Your Blog – Q&A, Part 2

Episode 43 of the ProBlogger podcast is part two of the Q&A series I’ve been doing on how to create great content for your blog (episode one is here). In it, I answer your most recent questions from the callout I put on the ProBlogger Facebook page about:

  • What are my three best blog posts ever and why they worked
  • What type of content I find most resonates with my audience, and whether I think video or the written word is more important and why
  • When I first started taking on paid writers, how I recruited them and how I added them to the schedule
  • What I think the pros and cons of outsourcing blog content are
  • Whether or not I believe there an optimal length or word count for a blog

I hope the answers are useful to you – I cover the post I almost didn’t publish but garnered more than 700,000 views, posts that get high traffic and how I keep them going across social media over time, my thoughts on video and audio content (especially in terms of audience and SEO), how I feel incorporating writers both brings value and dilutes your brand, the system we use for hiring new writers and editors, and the length of posts we’ve been publishing that make the most impact on our readership.

You can find episode 43 and the show notes at – would love to get your feedback.

Further Reading:

5 Tips for Optimising Facebook Ads Campaigns

This is a guest contribution from Luke Moulton.

Blogging about something you’re passionate about? chances are there are others just as passionate as you, and chances are, a high percentage of these people hang out on Facebook and share the stuff they’re passionate about. Using Facebook ads to reach your target audience can get people Liking and sharing your content, and kick-start your traffic if you’re just starting out.

If you’ve dabbled with Facebook ads and not seen much success or traction, here are a couple of techniques to try to improve performance.

1. Laser Focus on Your Target Audience

One of the biggest mistakes I see people make with Facebook ads is to go too broad with their audience targeting. You probably have a good idea of your target demographic. For example: new mums living in Los Angeles. So when you setup a Facebook Ad Set, make sure you target your audience accordingly.

5 Tips for Optimising Facebook Ads Campaigns

Recently I was helping an Australian e-commerce client with his Facebook ads campaigns. He has a range of items that are season and weather-dependent. Digging into his campaigns, I found that performance varied for cities in the north of the country compared to the south. Given it was winter in Australia when he was thinking of advertising, he was wasting money trying to promote warmer climate items to those in the southern states (remember, we’re in the Southern Hemisphere). Segmenting his campaigns down into regions (such as cities or states) help him to target products according to the weather in that region.

2. Boost Facebook Posts that are already getting traction

You may already have a healthy bunch of Facebook followers who share and like your content. When you notice a new piece of content you’ve posted getting more traction than usual, this is a good indication that the content could be popular to a broader audience.

This is a great opportunity to broaden you follower base.

5 Tips for Optimising Facebook Ads Campaigns

The trick that will ensure you get maximum engagement for you spend is to boost your post to “Friends of people who like your page” AND share a similar interest to what you blog about.

Doing this means that the “Friends of people who like your page” will see a little social proof on the ads that appear in their news feed. And social proof is a powerful motivator.

5 Tips for Optimising Facebook Ads Campaigns

3. Test vastly different images

Facebook is a very visual medium and the right image can make a huge difference in engagement and clicks to your ads. When you setup a new campaign, make sure you test at least 2 different ads that are identical except for the image.

Try adding a call to action to your image, making sure you your copy takes up 20% or less of the image space, as specified in Facebook Ads terms and conditions.

4. Setup Facebook conversion tracking

Wether you’re building an email list or selling product, Facebook conversion tracking gives you the ability to see which audience segments convert better, therefore giving you the ability to focus on getting more of those people to your website.

Running a Facebook ads report with Conversion metrics will show you (for example) which age range are converting best.

5 Tips for Optimising Facebook Ads Campaigns

In the example above, Women aged 55-64 are converting the best and costing the least. If you see something like this as an on-going trend, it can be worthwhile separating this audience out into their own Ad Set so you can try to better tailor your ads to this demographic.

5. Rotate your ads

If you’re targeting the same audience on an ongoing basis, eventually they are going to get sick of seeing the same ads week in week out. Try to set a monthly schedule to refresh your ads, or focus more on promoting your better performing posts.

Luke Moulton is a digital marketer specialising in Facebook Ads campaign management. Checkout more tips on his blog at Plankton Digital.

The 9 Habits of Blogging to Increase Your Chances of Success

This is a guest contribution from Jerry Low.

There is one thing that all successful bloggers have in common with one another:


They all have habits that keep them focused and productive no matter what else is going on. They can easily navigate the highs and lows of life and still keep blogging away.

These habits force them to focus on things like learning new techniques consistently and seeking new knowledge about blogging, SEO and best practices. They also network with others restlessly.

In order to succeed in any area of life, you have to work on that area consistently. By building the right habits, you increase your chances of success. Think about some of the most successful people you’ve ever heard of.

As pointed out in a Forbes article about developing habits, Michael Jordan practiced jump shots even during his off season; and the Williams sisters practiced tennis every morning before school. To find great success, you have to do more than anyone else and you have to do it consistently.

Every habit you want to build can be broken into a specific sequence of steps. By focusing on these small steps, you build winning habits over time.

In the book “Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard,” the Heath brothers suggest that to motivate the elephant (our emotion), you need to shrink the change.

What does that mean?

Build up the habit by taking steps to make it easier. Put your gym bag in your car’s trunk instead of focusing on the whole process of packing your gym bag, driving to the gym, sweating the heck out of yourself, driving back, showering, and unpacking the bag. Focus on one task at a time.

The same concept applies to blogging.

Focus on small tasks you can do, one at a time, and build the right habits. In fact, from my own experience and observations on other bloggers, having the right habit is the most important element in successful blogging.

When Ariana Huffington started the Huffington Post in 2005, people made fun of her. However, she had a vision. She consistently recruited celebrity bloggers and used some traditional, consistent marketing tactics. The rest, as they say, is history. She left many of her critics in the dust.

TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington provided solid technical information and news that anyone can understand. It is not the third most popular blog in the world. This was accomplished through consistent habits of posting about tech topics and being on the cutting edge of breaking news.

If you wish to have success as a blogger, here at the habits you should develop and keep:

1. Take notes anywhere, anytime

Find the most convenient way to keep all your notes together. There are many ways to do this. You can use index cards and file them. You can jot them down in your phone and transfer the ideas to DropBox or another online storage system. You can file them into folders on your computer.

The main point is to stay productive at all times. It doesn’t matter how you take the notes, just that you take them and make them easily accessible for future reference.

Personally I use Evernote to record all ideas and any reading online that I want to refer back to later. I use Evernote because it is easy for me to synchronize everything between my tablet, PCs, and mobile phones.


A quick view on my Evernote – where you can see how I group my readings and ideas into different notebooks.

2. Ask the right questions, always

Robert Kiyosaki shares a trick in his book “Rich Dad, Poor Dad”: he says you should always ask “How can I do this…” anytime you’re impressed by someone else or like an idea.

For example, you listened to one of Pat’s Smart Passive Income podcasts. You think that it’s the best blogging resource ever in the world. So, you ask, “How can I do something like this?”

When you look at another blogger’s income report, ask, “How can I make my blog better than theirs?”

By asking the right question (how?), you open yourself to endless possibilities.

By asking the right question (how?), your brain doesn’t stop at admiring others, but works to repeat what you admire. You keep yourself busy searching for a way to make others admire you as well and to emulate those you look up to.

3. Always optimize your content for search engine traffic

Even though we shouldn’t rely on search engines as our only traffic source, Google is still an important source for targeted audience traffic.

First, always include relevant keywords in your post headlines and titles. Do enough keyword research to understand what searchers are looking for typically and what other bloggers in your niche are writing. This means you should be doing keyword research just to see what is trending, what is getting the most traffic, and what you might want to write about in the future.

Some of the tools you can use for this research include:

4. Post your content to social media at the right time

Nearly all bloggers probably agree that sharing your content on social media isn’t optional. If you want to increase your reach, reach your readers, and get people talking, you simply have to have a social media presence at a minimum on the big three (Google+, Facebook, Twitter).

However, timing those posts just right can have a huge impact on how successful your social media campaigns are.

Generally speaking, if your targeted audience is mainly in the United States, the retweet rate could be 2x higher if you post at 6 p.m. instead of 6 a.m. according to KISSMetrics. Facebook shares on Saturday could be 100% better than shares on Sunday.

Not only does what day you post matter, but what time you post and even what words you use and the size of your image.

Figure out the best time to post on Twitter/Facebook/Pinterest for your profile by using freemium tools such as Adespresso and HootSuite. Then, simply share your important posts during prime time.


I manage all my Facebook campaign via AdEspresso. As you can see – one quick way to optimize your FB ads is to look at the “Best Period” to post your ads.

5. Stay away from distractions when writing

It’s easy to get distracted while writing. Whether you are in the kitchen and your daughter walks into the room and starts talking in the middle of that sentence you are writing, or you have a television playing in the background and something captures your interest, you may get distracted and lose your train of thought.

Our brains are not designed to multitask effectively. Apparently, our brains just don’t like to multitask. Doing more than one task at a time creates “splits” in the brain, which are called “spotlights” by researchers. So, your brain is just racing and trying to switch quickly between different tasks.

Researchers have found that it can take time for the brain to shift from one task to the other. Even if it is only 1/10th of a second, it reduces our attention to that task. While studies show that women are better at multitasking, it isn’t ideal for anyone. It is better to focus on one task at a time. You’ll actually get more done and get it done more quickly.

To work more efficiently and focus on the task at hand:

  • Turn off phones, email notifications, TVs
  • Logout from your favorite social media networks
  • Use a distraction-free tool such as OmmWriter or Cold Turkey if necessary

6. Maintain a balanced life

Burnout can be a serious problem with bloggers. You may have been working on your blog without a break for months on end and seeing very little reward.

It is important to maintain balance in your life or you may burn out, walk away from your blog and never return.

Take time out of your schedule to spend with family and friends. If you are religious, allow time in your schedule to attend ceremonies.

Spend time on other activities you enjoy. You’ll also be surprised at how motivation will strike when you’re doing other tasks.

7. They take care of themselves

Life is busy for everyone. You may have an outside job and blog at nights or on the weekends. Perhaps you have a family or a busy social life as well.

It can be hard to find the time to take care of ourselves with so much going on, but if you aren’t feeling well it is hard to do everything from stay on top of the tasks you need to complete to focusing on writing the best content possible.

  • Get regular exercise to keep your body healthy and your mind focused.
  • Don’t get so busy that you skip meals.
  • Get enough sleep. If you stay up until 3 a.m. every night working on articles, they may or may not make much sense to anyone else.

8. Network with others

Successful bloggers know that blogging can be hard and lonely. They don’t try to go it alone. Instead, they develop a network of like-minded website owners they can turn to for advice, guest posts, links and support.

For example, there are many groups on both Facebook and Twitter in just about any niche you can imagine that are solely for the purpose of networking. For example, if you are a garden blogger, you might join a group on Facebook for gardening bloggers.

Once you join these groups, fellow members will offer advice, tips and will like and share your content on social media. This expands your reach and it expands their reach as you return the favor.

Networking builds your audience and gives you a sounding board.

9. Last but not least, be consistent

In lists of habits of bloggers, there is one thing that comes up over and over again. Post consistently and be true to yourself and your audience.

  • Use analytics to figure out high traffic times for your blog and then choose that time to schedule posts.
  • Post on social media at the same time and on the same days so your followers know they can count on you.
  • If you have a voice, don’t try to change it. If your view today is that widgets are the best thing since sliced bread, you better have an awfully good reason if you plan to change that opinion.
  • Respond to reader comments. They should know they can count on interaction from you.

Your readers will come to trust your integrity and know they can count on you and will feel comfortable sharing your blog with others.

Look at Your Reasons for Blogging

In the end, it boils down to your reasons for blogging.

Do you actually have something to say or some unique knowledge to share? If you are only blogging to make money, then you’re a lot less likely to be successful.

The minute you aren’t making money or it takes longer than you thought it would to make money, you’ll abandon your blog. Instead, focus on reaching one reader you can help or building your audience. The monetization will take care of itself over time.

Jerry Low is a geek dad who enjoys building web assets. Learn how you can grow and monetize your blog better in his recent post here.

Behind the Scenes of our Latest Six Figure Product Launch


In today’s episode of the ProBlogger Podcast, I discuss the behind-the-scenes view of our latest product launch, which made $US120,000.

On my main blog, Digital Photography School, we have more than 30 products, and the Lightroom Presets Pack was our most recent. Today I go through the complete life cycle of the product, from how we came up with the idea, how we marketed it, how we launched it, and how it went.

I also describe how I learned about great marketing and launch strategies, and also what kind of things my audience would respond to by first promoting someone else’s product as an affiliate. Not only do you get to see for yourself the strategies other people are using to sell a similar product, but you can also gauge the reaction of your own readers to things like price points, email frequency, and interest in the product.


Today I discuss:

  • how long our Lightroom Presets Pack took to produce (and how we go about deciding what to produce in general),
  • our marketing system, how it works (and how this particular system was slightly different),
  • how we launch,
  • how we priced the product,
  • the discount we gave and why,
  • the competition we incorporated into the launch,
  • what kind of email campaign we usually run, and how we deal with it if the campaign isn’t working well, or if it is successful and needs extra time,
  • how often we send emails,
  • what was in the emails

I also talk about how we promoted this sale outside our email list – on the blog, on social media, etc , and how well that worked.


Of course it’s not always enough to retire on the launch success alone, so I also include our plans to continue sales after this initial run, how we incentivise affiliates to sell, what happens when affiliate sales aren’t as strong as we hoped, and what percentage they each make per sale.


I would love to hear your feedback on this process – what do you differently? what do you similarly? what kind of products do you have in development at the moment? feel free to leave a comment here, on the show notes, or on Twitter – I’m @problogger.

Further Reading:

Super Niching: The Dirty Little Secret Of Successful Bloggers Everywhere

Super Niching The Dirty Little Secret Of Successful Bloggers Everywhere - on

This is a guest contribution from Michaela Clark.

It’s the one thing most bloggers avoid talking about the most. A shameful, hidden secret we keep from each other.

It’s the old way of defining a ‘successful blog’– your website traffic numbers.

I’m here to combat the stigma of low readership and show you how having the right kind of targeted consumers of your content is the best thing you can do for your blog and how you can still make money blogging no matter what your audience size.

So here goes.

I’m Michaela. I write a blog for trades and building contractors.  I have less than a 1000 visitors a month and I still make money from blogging.

I am proud of every single one of the readers that I get and I’m not ashamed to admit it.   I work hard to inspire and connect with each and every one.  How amazing is it that a few hundred people a month actually want to read and listen to what I have to say? I wished my husband was as keen to hear what I have to say as some of my readers are.

So stop worrying about volume and look at how you are making a difference – even if it’s just one person you have an effect on. Isn’t that worth it?  That you can change one person’s life for the better with your words?

Without massive readership, how do I make money from my blog?

Well it’s actually really easy.  It’s all in the power of super niching.

A blog about cooking is a niche. A blog about cooking with tomatoes is a super niche.

The world will open up once you build authority in a clearly defined super niche.

How it all started:

Just over 12 months ago I went looking for online influencers to connect with to help promote my virtual assistant support business for trade contractors.

Sure there were lots of blogs about small business but I couldn’t find anyone that had built a following online around business advice for small, trade business owners. 

Spotting a ‘first to market’ opportunity, I decided to become the online influencer I had been searching for.

My first concern was that if no one else was doing it then it simply mustn’t work.  Even my mother said, “Surely there are people smarter than you that would have thought of this before now?” Geez mum, thanks for your vote of support there.

However with over 400,000 tradespeople in Australia alone, I knew there was an influencer gap there somewhere, just screaming to come out.

Straight away things began to change once I focused on delivering highly relevant and regular content to this area of the market.   I began to blog more and started to produce a bi-weekly business podcast just for trade contractors called the Tradies Business Show.

In less than 12 months and with only a handful of readers, I now have over 10 different revenue streams that are all a direct result of the content I am producing.

This additional revenue has been gained through sponsored posts, event sponsorships, podcast sponsorship,  affiliate deals, a membership site, product integrations, speaking and consulting. This is all in addition to the core VA services my business offers.

The key point I quickly realised was that potential partners and sponsors weren’t too concerned with my seemingly ‘low’ traffic numbers but rather the opportunity I gave them to speak directly to a highly relevant and engaged section of their target market.

Relevancy to the readers, not quantity of visitors, has become the new measurement of a successful blog.

Being relevant cuts through the noise, makes connecting easier and builds authority quicker.

Once you have authority you can achieve just about anything.

The power in super niching lies in the fact that it makes you relevant to those readers that matter– the ones that need your help the most.


It’s not about how many readers, but the right reader, that will make you money.

Recently I had someone ring me after reading my blog and watching some dodgy old videos of me on YouTube I had forgotten about.

I soon discovered this reader was actually the founder of a national company that has one of the biggest databases of trade contractors in the country. He rang to pitch me on how we could possibly partner together.

That one reader alone could potentially be worth millions to my business.

That only happened because of the niche content I was producing online.

Super niching will help you to attract the right reader and that is where the magic (and money) happens.

Do you have a super niche blog that you make money from?

Michaela Clark is the founder of Tradies VA,  co-host of the Tradies Business Show podcast, and Event Director of Podcast Revolution happening on the Gold Coast Nov 2015.

How to Create Great Content For Your Blog – Q&A, Part 1

How to Create Great Content For Your Blog – Q&A, Part 1

Today’s episode of the ProBlogger podcast is a melting pot of your inquiries – really diverse topics, such as:

  • Should I share personal posts on my business blog?
  • How often should I be posting on my blog?
  • How do you develop compelling content?
  • What days of week/time of day are best to post?
  • How did you come to have the great writing skills that you use to blog? Did you ever get any formal training?
  • What have been your most effective techniques for engaging readers? What types of posts have generated lots of authentic comments from your readers?
  • Where do you get your ideas for content? Do you have any techniques/tips to share?

I’m sure these questions are ones that more than one person has, so I’ve given quite extensive answers to each.

You can find episode 41 of the ProBlogger Podcast “How to Create Great Content For Your Blog – Q&A” at, along with show notes and extra reading.


I’m also planning on doing a part two to this series of Q&A podcasts, so feel free to head to the Facebook page and submit your question here.

Further Reading: