Close
Close

ProBlogger Coaching Services

Susannah has posted an interesting post on Getting a Big-Picture Person for your blog. She writes:

‘I was just sitting here feeling a bit dissatisified with myself and with this blog. How can I get more comments? How can I be better motivated to write more? How can I know what my readers really want from me?

And then it hit me: I need an editor.

Oh, not an editor in the traditional sense. I don’t need someone to check my spelling or grammar, or to make sure I’m libeling people. I take all that onto my own head. What I really need is someone who is interested in my focus, and who reads my blog and is tasked with thinking about things on a macro-level. Someone who can say, “Hey, you really missed the boat on that one,” or “I’m desperate to know more about X, Y, and Z.” In a sense I need a coach—a blog coach….’

I think a blog coach is a great idea and it is something I’m seriously considering getting more into myself. I’m probably not interested in coaching business bloggers – rather I’m thinking of starting a service for entrepreneurial bloggers.

I’ve spoken about this before but have not acted upon it for a few reasons. Firstly I’m heading overseas for a month shortly and don’t want to start something just before that, secondly I’ve got a couple of months to go on a non blog related project that takes two days per week of my time and thirdly because I’ve been trying to build up a little more credibility and a broader skill set to offer to potential coachees (is that a word?).

So – when I get back from OS in July – expect me to launch something new – a ProBlogger Coaching service. The details are forming in my mind but here is what I do know:

  1. ProBlogger.net will continue to run as a free blog (as it has been for the last few months).
  2. I won’t be taking on everyone who asks for coaching.
  3. I will be charging for the service.
  4. I am considering a variety of levels of coaching.

I am interested in what people think about such a service. I have a list of things I’ll offer potential clients that I’m not going to go public with yet – but I’m interested in what those of you as ProBloggers (beginners through to experienced) would be interested in being coached on.

Link Blogs

Steve Rubel has started a link blog. I’ve been wondering about doing something similar as there are so many stories that I see each day that I’d love to link to but don’t – for fear of cluttering things up too much here. Any thoughts friends?

Would you prefer it all together? A new blog? In my side bar? A bloglines blog? Interested in your opinions as it’s you who reads it.

Melbourne Blogger BBQ

Cameron Reilly and I have had a couple of breakfasts recently and both times we’ve talked about having a Melbourne bloggers get together. Of course with the busyness of life I’ve not done anything about it – but today Cameron has by posting a survey for Melbourne bloggers to respond to. He’s suggesting a Blogger BBQ.

So if you live in Melbourne (or country Victoria even) head over to the Cameron Reilly blog and fill in the survey he’s got running there to let him know your preferences.

Blogebrity – Creating Blogging Buzz in 3 Easy Lists

I’ve been watchign the Blogebrity Blog with interest this week – it’s been quite an amusing read and a great example of how a blog can get some big inbound links and a lot of buzz from the blogosphere with a little controversy, humor and by listing some big blogs as A-List Blogs, some almost as big blogs as B-List Blogs, some not so big blogs as C-List Blogs and a few million smaller blogs as not even making the C-List. On top of all the A,B and C listers linking to it to let their readers know about their own fame – it’s probably the millions of unnamed bloggers who will make this blog a successful with all their inbound links to it complaining about not making the list. See the full A, B and C lists here.

Whilst the validity of such lists will be debated til the cows come home – I give them an A for creating a buzz. Now it’ll be interesting to see what they do with the page rank and buzz they’ll build through the initial publicity.

Adsense Competitive Ad Filter URLs Missing?

Has anyone else noticed that their Adsense Competitive Ad Filter no longer has any URLs in it?

When I last checked there were at least 15 URLs on it – but today I noticed there were none.

Two readers have also notified me that they too have noticed this on their accounts.

How to Be A More Productive Blogger

Keith Robinson has a great post on how to Be A More Productive Blogger. He lists 13 (unlucky for some) points that he has found helpful in successfully creating content. It’s a quality list which I think would be helpful for bloggers big and small. Whilst there isn’t heaps of new thoughts for me in it I’m feeling quite inspired just reading it through. Thanks Keith – after a long week I think I needed this one. Here are his first few great points:

  • ‘Set aside time for writing (or podcasting, etc.) and stick to it. Sounds simple, but life (and work) has a way of intruding on these times. You need to hold on to your creative times at all costs!
  • Create (and stick to) a publishing schedule. I used to do this quite a bit when I was first getting started. It really helped keep me on track and motivated. Now I’ve got a loose schedule I use, but there are times when I try and plan out something more solid to help make sure I don’t fall too far behind.
  • Keep an Idea Journal. I’ve taken to having one by my bed, one on my person and if all that fails, I’ve got idea pages set up in Backpack. You never know when you’ll need a good idea!’

Keep reading this quality post at Be A More Productive Blogger

Found via Micro Persuasion.

Frequent Short Posts – A Secret of A-List Bloggers Success

Tristan Louis at TNL.net does an interesting post today which analyses 5 top blogs (Boing Boing, InstaPundit, Daily Kos, Gizmodo and Engadget) and how frequent and long their posts are.

‘The data became clearer. On that particular day, the top five bloggers created an average of 30 entries, with each entry being under 150 words.’

It’s a very interesting post and one that backs up a lot of the theory that I’ve argued here over the past 6 months. Frequent short sharp posts work on a number of levels:

  • Highly Targeted Content – A post of 150 or so words is likely to be pretty targeted on one particular topic. Search Engines love this – they know what it is about and will rank it higher on this.
  • Search Engines like shorter posts. I personally think 150 might be 100 or so words short of what is ideal for SE’s but the research shows that shorter posts tend to be dealt with better than longer ones by Google.
  • Readers like bite sized content - Research shows that readers scan content and that they rarely read things word for word. They also have notoriously short attention spans online. 150 words is easily digestible.
  • High quantities of posts = more entry points to your blog - write one long 4500 word post each day and you create 1 new page on your blog. This is one possible new entry point on your site each day that will be indexed by Search Engines, appearing in RSS feeds etc. Create 30 posts and you can see you increase the chances of your blog being found exponentially. Multiply this 30 daily posts by 365 days in a year and you start the see the potential of such a strategy.

[Read more...]

Jeff Jarvis on About.com

Interesting interview in Business week with Jeff Jarvis this week which examines his move to About.com and how he sees his work there unfolding:

‘Jarvis explained that about 50% of his time will be spent as a consultant on content development at About.com, the service that the New York Times bought in February. But he’s also hoping to help mold About’s business strategy. He would like to see its 500 guides used as “a platform for distributed media,” where the guides develop relationships with blogs. For instance, a travel guide could work together with a host of travel blogs to cover the landscape.

The rest of the time will be spent writing a book, which he plans to publish as he writes it on his blog to get feedback, and consulting with Advance.net, where he used to work. Jarvis was mum on the new news startup he’s working with, other than to say they’re raising venture money now and plan to debut later this year.’

I’m fascinated with his ideas for About.com – especially the talk of relationships with bloggers which could be a real win win situation for all concerned. Bloggers are on the ground reporting on every niche topic that About.com has in its stable – it makes sense for their tour guides to be in fruitful relationships with these bloggers. I know that I already am on speaking terms with a couple of their guides but would love to take these relationships to a deeper next step.

I guess time will tell as to how this all works out – but Jeff is definitely a guy to take About.com to the next step.

Writing Effective Blog Post Titles

Vaspers the Grate has an interesting experiment going looking at the last 5 titles on a variety of his favorite blogs. Steven writes:

‘I’m of the opinion that the title of your post is the most important text of the post.

If the post title is not good, many potential readers and RSS subscribers may just skip it. The post title is also vital for search engine optimization, and for grabbing the attention of blog surfers.’

The list of blogs he examines is a good one in itself (there are some great blogs there (not just because ProBlogger.net appears either).

I agree with Steven that the title of your post is crucial in a successful blog on a number of fronts:

  • SEO – search engines head straight to your title to determine what it is about and how to rank it.
  • Search Engine referrals – your title is usually what is listed in Search engines and is an opportunity to hook people in.
  • RSS referrals – people scan their News Aggregators looking for the posts that captivate and intrigue
  • Loyal Readers – Even those that bookmark your site and log on regularly to look at what you’re writing scan your page. Titles are attention grabbers that can pause their scanning and make them actually read what you have to say.

I know a lot of bloggers try to get quirky, cryptic and creative with their titles – I personally have nothing against this – but over the past two years have decided that it’s probably not the best way of attracting readers considering the above four points.

Rather I tend to go for a descriptive post that tells the reader what the post is about. I also aim to put the keywords I think people will be searching for for such a post in the title and make it as sharp and to the point as possible.

Of course rules are made to be broken – and the intriguing cryptic title can work from time to time – however if you use them too much you might just find your readers get frustrated with you and stop dropping by to see what that latest post is all about.

Adsense Gets a Redesign

The team at Adsense have been busy (as one can tell by my last few posts) – in addition to the icon and combination ads Blog Herald has notice a newly designed ‘Ad Settings’ page. In actual fact a little more digging reveals that they’ve redesigned most of their pages including the ‘search settings’ pages and ‘My Account’ pages.

Duncan speculates that it might be to help make room for new features. There could be something to this – although it could also just be a redesign and to increase usability as the settings pages were a little complicated.