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How Many Posts do you Need in your Archives to earn Money from Blogging?

Someone asked me just now -‘how many pages do I need on my blog for it to earn $XX.00s per day?’ Its a pretty common question and one that I’m going to tackle below – but first let me ponder another related question from Thomas who in my recent call for feedback on this blog asked:

‘Is there a direct and predictable relationship between the total income of a blog and the total number of blog posts?’

Its a good question and one I’m sure I’ve talked about before in my archives somewhere – but that I’m happy to write a little about again.

I’m going to generalize terribly here and give you a very short and blunt answer to your question Thomas – and I’ll expand upon it some more for those who want to journey with me some more on it.

The Short Answer – My generalized answer is ‘yes’ – I do believe that in most cases there is a relationship between the number of posts on a blog and the income that it currently generates.

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On ‘When to Post’ to your Blog

Just got a good email from Chris from Passive Digressive with some good questions in it. I’m about to duck out now so can’t reply to him at this moment – but thought I’d open up one of the questions for discussion to see what you my wonderful readers think. Feel free to answer it below in questions from your own perspective. Lets learn together. Chris writes:

‘I’m curious as to what you think about *when* to post.

Typically I’ve heard that it’s best to post near the beginning of the week to make it more likely that your post will be read. This implies that the blogosphere has a sort of weekly “pulse”. The closer to the weekend you post, the less likely your article will be read seriously. What are your thoughts on this?’

Over to your expert opinion fellow bloggers.

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How to Write Compelling Blog Posts

There is a good basic post on How to Write Compelling Blog Posts over at Marketing Profs. Nothing particularly new about it but a good place to start if you’re new to blogging and want to have a primer on how to write more effectively. Here is a taster.

‘Writing blog posts and comments on blogs is actually very simple. The basic guidelines: keep your copy lively, factual, tight, clear, short and search engine optimized.

Here are basic blog style guidelines to follow:

Adopt a direct style. Declarative sentences are good. Web readers demand them.

Link like crazy. One thing that distinguishes blog posts from dead-tree journalism is that bloggers link prodigiously….’

Read more at How to Write Compelling Blog Posts

Duplicate Posting and Free Articles = Duplicate Content

I’ve noticed a growing trend among bloggers who have multiple blogs to post the same post numerous times in different places.

I can see why such a practice might seem tempting:

  • it cuts down the work you have to do (two for the energy of one)
  • it increases the chance of your post being read by readers
  • if you’re making money from your blogs it double’s the chance of earning a dollar from your work

For these very reasons I’ve entered into duplicate posting in the past also. It just seems to make sense to get your material out there in as many places as possible doesn’t it?

Unfortunately whilst duplicate posting might have some of the above benefits it is also worth counting the cost of such a strategy. Duplicated posting might double the chances of your work being read, but it also runs the risk of getting you in trouble with Google. You see they don’t like duplicate content – content that appears in different places in the same basic form. They warn about this in their guidelines to webmasters.

‘Don’t create multiple pages, subdomains, or domains with substantially duplicate content.’

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What you can learn about writing Blogs from Infomercials

Search Engine Guide has an interesting post on – what you can learn about writing web copy from Infomercials. Whilst I’m not really sure I’d want my blogs to look too much like the infomercials we get here in Australia (they tend to be a laughing stock and very tacky) perhaps there is something to be learned. Here are the main points written about in the article. What do you think?

  • Define The Problem.
  • Deliver Your Solution.
  • Explain the Benefits, Not Just the Features.
  • Have a USP, or a Reason Your Company is Different.
  • Use Calls to Action Liberally Throughout the Copy.
  • Repeat the Key Phrases Frequently.
  • Target Your Audience for Best Results.

Read more at What You Can Learn About SEO Copywriting From Infomercials

The importance of the Scoop in Blogging

This week is a very busy week for me. Both in my general life but also my blogging. In particularly the blogging side of things is pretty hectic as there is a trade show happening in Orlando where all the major digital camera manufacturers unveil their newest models for the year ahead. Last year saw 60 or more cameras released in a couple of weeks and the indications are that this year will be similar.

As the editor of a Digital Photography Blog this means life is about to get a little crazy. Press Releases are hitting my inbox every hour or so, I’m scanning the manufacturers sites for pre release information and mistakenly early released information for new cameras and accessories. Of course I’m not alone as all the other digital imaging sites are jostling for position to see who can be the first to post the breaking stories.

You see there is a few reasons why its good to be first.

1. Prestige – its great to be able to say you were first to post information on a new camera or that you broke the news on something that no one else knew about. This actually does your site some good in the PR stakes. Digicam enthusiasts respect you if you’ve got your finger on the pulse – plus it feels good.

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The Importance of Good Headlines for RSS

Poynter Online has a great post about the importance of having a good headline in your RSS feed.

‘But what do I do with headlines like “Dramatic change” (which turned out to be about a change in the government’s attitude toward immigrants) or “An unfinished story” (this deals with the U.S. inauguration). And these are just a couple of random picks from a Norwegian feed I read last night. Both those headlines belong in a newspaper or on a website, where there is room for a picture and a blurb. They have no place in my RSS reader. Or in my mobile phone’s WAP reader. Because I can’t even make up my mind if I’m interested.

With RSS and WAP, more and more journalism relies on headlines alone. So they better be good. And they better be informative.’

This is so true. I’ve actually done some tracking of the most popular posts on this site for those reading my RSS feeds and have noticed that it is usually the simple, clear and informatively titled posts that get the most hits. Yes occasionally I’ll get a little clever, humorous and cryptic and come up with a title that tries to be intriguing, witty or mysterious – but more often than not the simple ones do much better.

Of course I show the first few sentences in my RSS feeds also (not that everyone chooses to view them) so your opening line is also vitally important to getting people to read on.

I’ve touched on this topic previously in a number of posts includeing:

- Titles are Everything

- Get to the Point

- Blogging for Change – Rejection to Attention

Rhythmic Blogging

There is a good collection of blogging tips over at Leave It Behind’s Building a Better Blog with a few tips that I’ve not seen on too many other similar lists. I like this one:

3. Publish During High Traffic Times



If one of your desires is to generate traffic, try to publish during high traffic hours. Many people scan weblogs.com and other services (including TypePad and many TypePad member sites) for recently updated weblogs. Also, publishing during prime waking/working hours will give other writers time to comment, link, or respond to your post. A brilliant post in the middle-of-the-night will often get buried by the morning rush of fresh content.

I’ve found this to be true also – especially in the last 6 months with the rise of RSS feeds for some reason. There are periods of the day that I notice seem to bring a flood of traffic and posting in the middle of them can be very beneficial. It is a matter of being aware of the natural rhythms of your blog and exploiting them for your own benefit.

However having said that – its also important not to flood your blog with traffic all at once because you risk burying your posts in one another. I know sometimes I get on a roll and could easily post 5 or 6 posts within 5 minutes of one another to the same blog. In such instances I generally save half of them as drafts and slowly release them every few hours – a nice constant rhythm of posting should give your blog every chance of a nice constant influx of readers throughout the day.

How Obvious is your Blog’s Topic?

Can your readers identify what your blog is about quickly?

SEO Scoop has a good basic tip on making the topic of your posts obvious as a method of optimizing your page. I would extend this tip to the front page of your blog also.

‘Go to a page on your website that you are actively promoting but are having trouble ranking. Have your mother or grandmother or some non-techy friend look at the page. Give them only about 5 seconds to glance at it. Now close the browser and ask the person what the main topic of the page was. If they can give you the correct answer, give yourself a pat on the back. If they give the wrong answer, or just have no idea, you need to go back and do some more work on that page.’

It’s not rocket science – but its very true. So often I’ve been asked to look at blog to give advice and have found them to be so cluttered and complicated that its taken me concerted effort to even work out what they are about.

It is confession time – I’m a very lazy web surfer. If I go to a page and have to do work to understand what it is about then I generally leave within a few seconds. However if I can quickly ascertain the nature of the site and am engaged within the first few seconds I’m likely to stay a while and even come back.