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Blogs Are Business Support Tools, Not Direct Money Makers

Fredrik from CorporateBloggingBlog has an interesting post on making money directly from blogging and writes:

‘I’m not sure why so many people are looking for direct revenue streams from blogging. Or, well, I understand why. We all have to pay the mortgages. But I don’t think that blogging as such ever will be more than a small niche business.’ Read more at : Blogs Are Business Support Tools, Not Direct Money Makers

I have to agree with Fredrik – but also disagree. I think the majority of money to be made from blogging probably comes from other activities on the edge of blogging and not directly from the activity of posting articles. For instances blogging tools, support services (like providing advertisers for bloggers) and blog consulting are obvious examples of how people can make money indirectly from blogging – however I think its been proven that it is possible to not only make a few dollars directly from blogging – but to make a decent income from it. I know of a growing number of full time bloggers who sustain their total income from their blogging (most of whom are not willing to go public about it for fear of being copied). Of course this is a small number of people and is an activity that will become more difficult as more and more bloggers give it a go and compete – but I really believe that the market is big enough to sustain a good deal of bloggers taking this approach.

Average Blogger makes $20 to $50 per Month

WebPro New has an article on the rise of blogging and estimates that the average blogger is making $20 to $50 each month. I’m not sure how they come to this figure – I know many bloggers, 90% of whom make nothing from their blog. Another 9% might make a few dollars each month (probably less than $20) and then there is a very small percent who make good money from blogging. I guess if you average it out those earning big money would increase the average – but I doubt if you averaged out the millions of bloggers that you’d find $20-$50 is the figure.

‘Blogging is growing at a phenomenal rate with a new blog being registered every 7.8 seconds.

Blogs are being established by a wide range of people from individuals who simply want to express their thoughts through to corporate communication executives who want to influence their market place. Blogs enable information to be disseminated almost instantaneously. They are easy to set up, easy to use and they are easy on your audience.

The typical blogger makes around $20 to $50 profit per month which just about covers the costs of maintaining their blog. This income is mostly generated through Pay Per Click revenue from services such as Google’s Adsense, from affiliate earning through the recommendation of books and other products and from paid advertising revenue for banners and text links….’

Read more at Blogs Being Registered Every 7 8 Seconds

How big is the Blogosphere?

Clickz has a good article on the size of the Blogosphere which continues to grow.



‘The size of the blogosphere has doubled every five months over the last year and a half, according to blog analysis firm Technorati. Over that time, blogs have gone from being a word that sounded insulting to an online trend embraced even by a sexagenarian Massachusetts senator running for president. Given the frenetic pace of that growth, data charting the blog phenomenon have been vigorously consumed, and in some cases contradictory….

According to David Sifry, Technorati’s chief executive, the current number of blogs is now over 8 times bigger than the 500,000 blogs it measured in June, 2003.’

Read more at The Blogosphere By the Numbers

How To Plan Your Week Making Money At Home

How To Plan Your Week Making Money At Home is an interesting article with some practical tips on how to have a money making week at home on the internet…



‘Is it really possible to earn a 6 figure income on the internet? The answer to that is yes, but not everyone will do it! WHY?

The biggest lie told everyday on the internet is you can make money at home doing nothing.

“Join my program and I will build your downline for you. I do all of the work. This is so easy anyone can do it in their underwear. Buy my book and you will be successful.”And on and on…. We have all fallen for this at one time or another.

My book shelf is full of books I have bought online and never finsished reading. Who has ime to read all of this stuff and still actually work at making money?’

Internet Ad Spending Hits New Heights

ClickZ reports‘Internet ad spend topped $2.4 billion last quarter, according to the quarterly “Internet Ad Revenue Report” conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) on behalf of the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB).

The third quarter estimates mark the eighth consecutive quarterly increase for the industry and the fourth record-setting quarter. Q3 2004 represents a 35.3 percent increase over the $1.79 billion of the year-ago quarter, and a 2.4 percent increase over the $2.37 billion of the previous quarter.

“Historically, the second and fourth quarters are the strongest in advertising,” said Greg Stuart, the IAB’s president and CEO. “That the industry bested Q2 revenues is testament to the confidence and success marketers have found in the medium. As the experts predict, the holiday season should be a merry one for the industry.”

Revenue for the first nine months of 2004 totaled slightly over $7.0 billion, compared with the $7.3 billion in revenue reported for all 2003. Based on these numbers, 2004 could be a record year, beating the previous $8.0 billion revenue record reported in 2000, according to Pete Petrusky, director of advisory services at PwC.

The third-quarter figures are an estimate, based on aggregated data from the top 15 online ad sellers. These results were extrapolated to calculate the total estimated industry revenue figure. Actual Q3 results will be appear in PwC’s full report, expected in Spring 2005.’



Read more at Report: Internet Ad Spending Hits New Heights

These Traffic Numbers Are Real

‘Mention “audit” to David Barlin, vice president of marketing for I/Pro, a company that verifies audience data for about 500 small and medium-sized websites, and he practically gushes.

“They’re exciting,” he said, not at all defensively. “Really.”

That’s because he and the company he works for see a potential gold mine in independently auditing the traffic for all the sites that are not Google, Yahoo or MSNBC — the tens of thousands (if not hundreds of thousands) of commercial websites dedicated to niche subjects like business-to-business, chemical engineering, software development and online publishing. Since fans of these types of sites rarely make it to the mass portals, advertisers have been clamoring for ways to reach them.

Of course, Yahoo is fine if you want to peddle mass consumer items like, say, camera phones, vacation getaways and the latest Hollywood offering. But if you want to sell a new type of chip, manufacture routers or market a B-to-B website, you need to go straight to the people most likely to buy your product. To figure out whether a certain site will give a sufficient return on advertising, however, requires accurate traffic forecasts, something that has been lacking.’

Read more at Wired News: These Traffic Numbers Are Real

Minkmedia Launches UK Blog Network

Minkmedia is the latest network of Blogs to launch. This one is based in the UK and describes itself as:

‘Mink Media is a nanonpublisher. We publishe a series of weblogs (five so far) aimed at a British audience.



A weblog is a topical website, new stuff appears at the top, and it updates frequently (more than once a day). People are excited about weblogs (or blogs)–we basically think they are fun to read.’

Mink Media is run by Azeem Azhar and Shehnaz Suterwalla

They are offering a few opportunities for advertisers to partner with them – either as a premium sponsor (privately arranging banner ads etc), via Blog Ads or text ads via Adbrite. They are also running Google ads and Amazon affiliateships which is a good idea until they build up a high enough readership to run more premium sponsorships.

They currently have two main blogs running – these being:

- Wanda Lust – a blog about Travel

- Honourabloe Fiend – a blog about politics in Britain

They are open to being approached by bloggers wanting to join their network and I’ve no doubt we’ll see them add new blogs to their two current ones shortly.

Making Money from Blogs – BloggerCon III

I wish I were able to get to BloggerCon III – the Making Money session sounds particularly interesting as reported on PaidContent.org. Here are a few of the quotes that they quote that I find of most interest:

– “One sure way to make money — provide infrastructure to people like me.”
– to make money from Google, “try to be as small and niche-like as possible.”
– Dave Winer wants to know why we’re talking about nickels and dimes instead of the real money that can be made by creating business because of your blog, with people you meet through the blog, with ideas that bubble up through the blog? He says he flips hundreds of thousands of dollars through his blog.
– An author says he can make twice as much referring his book through Amazon then from the royalty.
– “If you want to make money from blogging maybe it’s not your personal blog that’s going to do it.”

Read more at PaidContent.org’s coverage of BloggerCon III

update – a few of other bloggers are also covering this session at:
- RConversation
- Roland Tanglao’s Weblog
- John Furrier

Paying bloggers: Participating in the conversation

There is a couple of interesting articles the last few days on the topic of blogging for dollars starting over at Red Herring Blog who is writing about Paying bloggers: Participating in the conversation. He’s got some helpful things to say on the topic and suggests a way forward:

‘Pay bloggers for feeds of their sites that are aggregated to topical blogs hosted by a sponsor. For example, if a snack food maker wants to have a blog, fill it with postings provided by food enthusiasts. Any number of companies are in the position to fulfill this role in the market. By hosting the comment sections for the aggregated blogs, these companies would provide sponsors the ability to participate in the conversation without necessarily intruding on the source blogs’ discussions.’

Then also at Raving Lunacy where the topic is Blogvertising is probably a zero sum game who seems to like the idea of blogging for money but can’t see it working. He writes:

‘One of the latest ideas floating around the blogsphere is getting paid for blogging. This idea was kicked of by a post by Marc Canter whose proposition is that there is this enormous pool of money out there that bloggers can get a slice of by promoting products. This is a silly idea and doomed to failure.