If Blogging Were a Sport, Here are Three Things I Learned While Playing the Game

If Blogging Were a Sport, Here are Three Things I Learned While Playing the GameThis is a guest post from Laura Forde from Life of the Differently Abled.

When I think of blogging, I think of a sports stadium with a game being played on the field.

It truly doesn’t matter the sport in question for this analogy to work, what matters is this:

What matters is that the sport has many moving pieces and each one has an important role to play in the completion of the match. We are all required to play within the restriction of those rules, but for some of us those rules don’t cover our reality.

All my life I have played all sports with an adapted rule book. My set of rules were added to by my physical limitations that others simply didn’t have. Those extra ‘rules’ could have set me back, but instead they caused me to work harder, give more to the game and this in turn gave me a competitive edge.

An example of such an adaptation in sport is sledge hockey. For those of you unfamiliar with sledge hockey, it is adaptive hockey that follows the rules of international ice hockey, but the adaptation comes in, in terms of the equipment used. Because sledge hockey is played mainly by people with some form of mobility limitation they use a device called a sledge. It is a contraption that one sits in, and then propels themselves using pics attached to the non-shooting end of two mini hockey sticks (players have two sticks one for each hand)

Adaptive sport isn’t often about changing how the game is actually played, but more about making it accessible to everyone regardless of physical ability.

But back to blogging.

I started blogging knowing absolutely nothing about blogging. Would I sink or swim? To know I had to jump in! I took action and found I didn’t sink. Everything I have learned to date I have extracted from watching and learning from those who know how to blog.

The immediate thing that drew me into blogging was that I could play it as an adaptive sport. if I could type with my fingers even slowly or via a voice dictation software I had a way to play.

And in learning to blog, I learned something about myself and what makes me able to ‘play a sport and win the prize I seek’ despite the tougher rule book which is my lot.

The three things I have learned from blogging

  1. Believe in yourself and what you have to say
  2. Don’t let any fears stop you, especially fear of what others will think. Be yourself and serve from there
  3. And before you give up on anything in life that you truly want remember:
  • Believe in yourself because when you start believing in yourself, whatever your apparent limitations, others will take notice and start believing in you too
  • Go beyond your greatest fear
  • Be your best self

So tell me which of these three lessons have you found the most valuable to apply in your own life and where did you first learn it? Comment below.

Laura Forde is one of few bloggers who writes about life with cerebral palsy from a first hand account you can find her blogging at Life of the Differently Abled.

Reading Roundup: What’s New in Blogging Lately

Reading Roundup: What's new in blogging this week /

It’s the weekend again (with bonus school holidays for some!) and the wrap-up of blogging goodies online. No matter how much I think I’ve read on a topic, there’s always something I learn, or a new perspective to take that I haven’t explored yet.

How to Boost Your Engagement with Visual Content // Social Media Examiner

Definitely a few new ideas I hadn’t thought of yet, and links to the tools that make them.

6 Aspects of SEO the Busy Entrepreneur Can Finally Stop Worrying About // Search Engine Journal

Do you agree with these? They definitely gave me food for thought. I do like the idea of link earning rather than link building.

Why Your Colleagues Still Won’t Share Your Blog Post // Hootsuite

Yeah sure, we know the science behind how to get shared, but what happens when it doesn’t work?

SEO Tips for Social Media Managers // Sprout Social

Solid tips that sometimes we forget. Bonus – the graphics are pretty!

Your Website is Way Too Confusing: Simplify Your Website with the KISS Rule // KISSmetrics

I changed my blog a few months ago to a minimalist theme and I cannot recommend it highly enough. No, it won’t work for everybody, but it’s pleasing to the eye and keeps the focus on the content. Is your website too busy?

The Perfect Anatomy of a Modern Web Writer // Copyblogger

With bonus infographic! This is for everyone who is a web writer, who wants to become one, or who wants to hire one. Tons and tons of useful info here.

Is Facebook Finally Introducing a “Dislike” Button? Not Exactly // Slate

Errbody’s talking about it: but what’s actually happening with the Facebook “dislike” button? It’s actually more about empathy. What are your thoughts?

10 Common Mistakes When Setting up Audiences in AdWords // Search Engine Land

I’ve been looking into AdWords lately, so this came at the right time. Learn from the mistakes of others, eh?

The Anatomy of a Shareable, Linkable, and Popular Post: A Study of Our Marketing Blog // Hubspot

Everything from the effect of word count on social shares to the number of links’ effect on organic traffic, they’ve really crunched the numbers on this one. Fascinating stuff.

5 Overlooked But Super Effective Ways to Boost Sales on Your Blog // Jeff Bullas

Have you been overlooking these too?


What news have you read lately that taught you something?

Stacey Roberts is the Managing Editor of a writer, blogger, and full-time word nerd balancing it all with being a stay-at-home mum. She writes about all this and more at Veggie Mama. Chat with her on Twitter @veggie_mama or be entertained on Facebook.

7 Habits of Lucky Entrepreneurs

7 Habits of Lucky Entrepreneurs on ProBlogger.netIn today’s episode of the ProBlogger podcast, I’m talking about all things luck. How important is it in business and blogging? How much of luck is really just hard work? Do you need to be lucky to successful.

My first steps along this journey into blogging really were lucky, I feel. It all started from a random email one day sent to my Hotmail from my mate Steve – and it changed the trajectory of my life. As I look back over the years since there have been many lucky moments along the way, chance encouncers, meeting the right people at the right time, being in the right place at the right time sort of thing but there has also been hard work and strategy.

I’ve talked to plenty of successful people and I often ask them if their success is due to serendipity or strategy, and today I share I’ve learned from them, the seven lessons we can really take on board to increase the chances of lucky things happening to us.

I share what I know about learning, curiosity, problems, positivity, experimentation, creation, daydreaming, reflection, knowing your place in space, reactions, pivoting, small change, and mindset – and almost none of them are personality traits, they’re learned behaviours.

I also provide some questions designed to get you thinking about how you make your decisions and deal with setbacks.

You can hear episode 45 of the ProBlogger podcast: 7 Habits of Lucky Entrepreneurs here.

Further Reading:

10 Ideas for Finding Blogging Inspiration

10 Ideas for Finding Blogging Inspiration on ProBlogger.netThis is a guest contribution from Larry Alton.

No matter what famous authors tell you, writer’s block is a real thing, and it’s not easy to overcome. If you’ve spent much time in the content creation world, you’ve probably done your fair share of staring at a blank word document, wondering what you should be writing next. However, that gets you no closer to your end goal. If you find yourself hitting a wall the next time a blog post is due, consider these inspirational tactics. 

Set Up Google Alerts

When in doubt about what to write next, stick to current news and events. By setting up Google Alerts, you can always be aware of the biggest trending news topics and subtopics. It also introduces you to new content sources and helps you stay informed about what’s happening with your niche in real time.

Subscribe to Similar Blogs

Be aware of what your competitors are blogging about. Monitor their latest topics by subscribing to their blogs. This will allow you to enter the current conversation rather than end it, which is what your bloggers really want.

The topics others are writing about will give you inspiration for your own blog and keep you up to date on current topics. However, beware of taking the same angle as a competitor. In most cases, you’ll want to take a different angle on the same topic so that you aren’t simply mimicking other blogs.

Post a Poll

Readers love to be given a chance to participate, and posting a relevant poll is a great opportunity to engage readers while gaining useful feedback. You can do this on both social media and your blog post. At least once a week, ask an interesting question and let the answers tell you what your readers want to read now.

For example, you might ask them what movie they watched last, what their greatest fear is, or any other question that could spur relevant content for your blog. If you have a vast readership, consider using a free polling service that will make collecting the results easy.

Invite Guest Authors

If you’ve really hit a wall with no immediate signs of recovery, get a guest blogger to post on your website. This will keep your readers entertained while you take some time to generate new ideas. There are several online tools you can use to find guest bloggers for your website at decent prices.

Take a Walk

Still can’t think of a topic? How long have you been sitting in your desk chair? Your prolonged stationary position is probably only stifling your creativity. The longer you sit staring at the computer screen, the more your brain begins to get sleepy, distracted, and burnt out.

Going for a walk or exerting some other form of enjoyable exercise will help you to be more awake and alert and give you the boost of creativity you desperately need to get writing again.

Blog About Mistakes

The general population loves to read about mistakes. It makes them feel human and allows them to learn a powerful lesson. We’ve all heard the old adage, “You learn more from failure than success,” and readers eat that stuff up. The next time you can’t think of a topic, reflect on a recent mistake you made and create a blog post based on that.

Talk It Out

Blogging is a solitary job, and you can gain powerful insights from talking with a friend or family member. Explain your problem and talk about some ideas you’ve considered or talk through what’s blocking your inspiration. Your friend doesn’t need to know anything about your blog or offer any suggestions. Simply talking about your dilemma out loud is an excellent way to spark creativity.

Write About a Controversy

Do you feel differently about a hot topic than many of your competitors? Address the controversy. Every niche has a subject that’s currently garnering both attention and fire. Don’t ignore what’s popular. Take a stance on the current hot topic and discuss the matter in depth.

Ask Questions

Furthermore, if there’s a controversy in your industry that you’re undecided about, ask your readers what they think. Begin by offering context on the subject and explain a few of your competitors’ viewpoints; then ask readers what they think. This is another great opportunity to engage with your fans, and it will help you come to a conclusion regarding this topic.


Get out of your office and into the world where you can view a world of interesting people making interesting decisions. Go somewhere where your target audience usually congregates, and observe their actions. You can gain a lot with your insights from this activity.

There are hundreds of things you can do to get out of a writing slump and inspire a topic that’s truly creative. One of those things might be entering a community where you can find inspiration for blog posts, network with other writers, apply for gigs, and learn more about your trade.

Larry Alton is an independent business consultant specializing in social media trends, business, and entrepreneurship. Follow him on Twitter and LinkedIn.

How to Use Blab Live Streaming to Grow Your Blog


NewImage.pngIn today’s episode of the ProBlogger podcast, I am talking about a new tool for bloggers and content creators that I’ve really taken to: Blab. It’s kind of like the lovechild of Google Hangouts and Periscope, and I’ve been experimenting with it a lot lately.

When I first heard of Blab I was sceptical, but over the next few days I noticed quite a few people I respect were using it, so I checked it out properly. It was broadcasting the speaker, much like other apps, but I quickly realised it solved a problem that I’d been having with Periscope – it was too much centred on me, and Blab meant I could have greater interaction with the people watching and listening, which was a much more two-way conversation.

In episode 44, I describe how Blab not only has been useful for me, but also how I think it can be useful to you to help grow your blog – from deepening relationships with your audience, getting ideas from chat and Q&A sessions, the ease of sharing Blab content, replays, continuation of videos, repurposing blog posts or posts you’ve written elsewhere, to the benefits of being able to interact in real time, whether it’s a keynote-style presentation or a more relaxed conversation.

I talk about how I use Blab, the basics of getting started, how I learned best practice, and tips to help you on your live streaming journey.

You can find episode 44 of the ProBlogger podcast: How to Use Blab Live Streaming to Grow Your Blog here, along with show notes and extra links.

You can also follow me on Blab here, and be notified of future broadcasts.

Are you on Blab? Leave a link to your profile in the comments.

Further Reading:

Can Launching a “For Beginners” Blog Still Work?

Can Launching a "For Beginners" Blog Still Work?This is a guest contribution from Karol K.

Here’s the thing. One of the prevailing myths around blogging is that the best way to start a new blog is to find a topic you’re passionate about, and then build a blog targeting a general, beginner audience interested in it.

For example, if your passion is WordPress then a (seemingly) good idea for a blog is something like “Beginner’s Guide to WordPress.”

Well, here’s the kicker … even though it might sound like a good idea, it actually isn’t.

In theory, you should be able to attract beginners and effectively be the first resource they encounter. But in practice, most of your readers will already be familiar with some of the big-name blogs in your niche by the time they even get to yours.

Those big-name blogs have all the power they need to sweep your target audience right from under your nose. They have the reputation, they have the brand and they have the social proof that beginners look for.

So what to do?

Is the “beginners” market so saturated that there’s no place left for you? Should you just abandon the idea of blogging entirely?

In a sentence: Of course not!

Let’s look into the possibilities that are still out there, and the specific things to do if you want to get into blogging.

Fork in the road – three paths to blogging

Taking the problem described above into account, there are basically three paths you can follow:

  • Launch a “for beginners” blog anyway. Hey, it will be difficult, but it’s not impossible, provided you have these two things: (1) a big budget to spend on promotion, SEO and other marketing-related things, or (2) a truly unique angle that has the potential to stick right from the get-go.
  • Launch a blog in a specialized area within the “beginners” niche. Using my previous example, a specialized area in “Beginner’s Guide to WordPress” might be a “Designer’s Guide to WordPress” – exactly what CodeinWP did when launching their blog meant for WordPress enthusiasts and pros.
  • Launch a blog focusing on more advanced aspects of the niche. Here, you’ll be going the completely opposite way and not paying much attention to beginner topics.

All of the above have their pros and cons, so let’s go over each and get a little more in-depth here.

“For beginners” blog

The main advantage of launching a “for beginners” blog is that creating content shouldn’t be very challenging. I mean, I know that bloggers have to be able to provide quality no matter who they’re writing for, but creating beginner content is always … what’s the word … lighter than creating advanced content.

It’s also easier to explain the purpose of your blog and probably convey its brand too.

Moreover, beginner blogs can usually utilize different content types more effectively than advanced blogs. For instance, it’s way easier to conduct an interview with a respected figure in the niche and prepare a list of questions that everyone can benefit from (not only advanced listeners).

On the other hand, the main downside is that making such a blog popular is next to impossible. Okay, maybe I’m a little too harsh, but let’s not forget that only a small part of blogs manage to attract more than 200 visitors a day, and the more competition you have, the more difficult it gets.

In order to grow such a blog, you’ll have to invest not only in good SEO, active social media promotions, massive guest blogging, but also in promotion through other online media channels like YouTube or podcasting.

Specialized “for beginners” blog

Launching a specialized “for beginners” blog shouldn’t be much more difficult than launching a standard one; although creating regular content can be a bit more challenging and will require more time.

However, one of the great things about such sites is that they become somewhat authoritative by default right from day one. For instance, if you title your blog “The Beginner’s Guide to Grilling Steak” then very few people will question your expertise in that space. It’s much more difficult to portray yourself as an expert in “all things cooking,” than it is in “all things grilling steak.” The same thing goes for most other niches too.

For example, this approach was neatly used by Ruben Gamez of Bidsketch when he launched a blog to get more people interested in his main product – project proposal software for freelancers. The main idea of the blog was to focus on topics related to project proposals and working with clients.

Such a strategy has made it easier to get the initial stream of visitors and build a core audience. In comparison, launching and growing a blog that simply talks about marketing or business would have been much more difficult.

Essentially, the more niche you go, the easier it is to find a small group of devoted fans. That being said, the problem you might encounter sooner or later is that building your audience can gradually become more challenging every month. You can simply start running out of audience, so to speak.

What to do when that starts to happen? Pivot. Start writing about other more general topics related to your niche. Your core audience will help you spread the word and reach new readers. Readers who would have never stumbled upon you otherwise.

Good SEO and other promotional methods are still important when growing a specialized niche blog (like they always are). So you will need to devote significant amount of your time to that. On the bright side, your hyper-niche idea is most likely to stick right away and resonate with a targeted visitor who’s actively interested in the topic.

Advanced niche blog

A good way to get a grasp on what an advanced blog should cover is to think about one of your passions and try answering the following question:

What were the things you were interested in once you were already 2 to 3 years into your passion? In most cases, this is the kind of topics that are perfect for an advanced blog.

Nevertheless, an advanced blog is probably the most challenging project to launch successfully from a content creator’s point of view. Advanced content is always the most time-consuming type of writing, and it needs to be 100 percent accurate with no room for mistakes (advanced audiences will quickly catch those).

Thankfully, you don’t have to publish new posts very often. Even once a week or once every other week will do just fine, as long as your content is extremely useful.

Just like with the other two types of blogs described here, good SEO is always the key ingredient. Luckily, the keywords for an advanced blog are usually less competitive and easier to target. Most of them are long tail keywords.

For example, two or three weeks ago I wanted to get some info on creating a grandchild theme in WordPress. The phrase I used in Google was something like “how to create a child theme of a child theme WordPress” … this is what we call long tail.

The greatest power of long tail keyword phrases is that when someone searches using them, they are almost 100 percent certain to visit your page if the title (more or less) matches their search query. Going long tail, as a searcher, is the ultimate desperate move. It simply means that you haven’t been able to find quality information with shorter queries.

One more cool thing is that the big and popular blogs in your niche are more likely to link to a blog that covers advanced topics. That’s because you’re positioning yourself as the “next step up” kind of resource. Comparing this to a scenario where you have yet another “for beginners” blog, there’s just no need for an already established popular “for beginners” blog to link to it.

Taking action

All three types of blogs have their individual challenges and pros and cons to tackle. But in the end, launching a successful blog is always a lot of work. I’m sure you’re familiar with Darren’s story on how he built his blogs.

Every project like this should start with a good plan. I hope that this post will help you craft such a plan and then put it in practice.

Lastly, what’s your opinion about blogging in “for beginners” niches? Does it still make sense to do it?

Karol K. (@carlosinho) is a freelance blogger and writer, published author, and online business figure-outer. His work has been featured all over the web, on sites like:,,,,,, and others. Feel free to contact him to find out how he can help your business grow by writing unique and engaging content for your blog or website.

How She Does it: Blogger Pip Lincolne Talks Finding Time to Write Books

How She Does it Blogger Pip Lincolne Talks Finding Time to Write Books on

As Darren said a little while ago, everybody has a book in them, but it’s probably more accurate to say every blogger has at least 10 ideas for eBooks inside them. If you’re a writer, you’ve got a lot to say. You might want to write eBooks, print books, memoirs, autobiographies – a thousand ideas, but realistically not a lot of time in your schedule for your one (or many!) overarching grand plan.

You may well set aside 15 minutes every day to chip away at it, or you schedule some vacation time and get a chunk done. You might stop blogging over a certain period, or you could burn the candle at both ends… the choice always depends on the person making it.

I was given a fantastic piece of advice lately, and that’s if you want to do something, you don’t find time, you make time. So I asked one of the most prolific bloggers I know how she makes time to do write more involved books in addition to all the other things she does. Pip Lincolne is the author of five published books and is a regular contributor to blogs, websites, and magazines.  She blogs at Meet Me at Mikes, and she graciously asked a few questions I had for her recently.

How do you make writing books fit into your everyday busy life?

I prioritize it. You know how you might insist on having a lunch break every day? (If you can!) I treat writing a book as seriously as having lunch and block out an hour or two each day to get the words down (let’s call that a long lunch, actually!) Some days are busier than others, but I always make sure that I spend at least an hour on the book I’m working on to be sure that I’m on deadline, but also to ensure I stay in the zone and keep things flowing nicely.

Do different styles of books take different times to write?

Well, I can only speak from my own experience here. I’ve written books with lots of craft projects in them, and more recently one with only a few craft project (and a more substantial observational-style writing element.)

The books with more instructional elements take more time, because not only are you ‘translating’ practical steps onto the page, you have to test those steps and rewrite and test again.

Although I got my start in publishing writing how-to type books, I much prefer the creative flow that observational writing offers.

Do you have a particular writing style now after writing so many? Is there a rough formula you follow?

I think I have a very consistent style, but sometimes, if I’m weary I might slip out of that story telling, chatty mode and into more of a documentary style. I much prefer the former and think that our writing uniqueness comes from writing in the same chatty way that we’d speak to a dear friend. Of course, if you are writing a more technical text, that might might not always be appropriate, but I’m lucky enough to be able to stay true to the voice that comes naturally for me.

I don’t really have a formula, but I do try to make sure that my work has clarity, flow and warmth to it. I triple check what I write for ‘sense’ because I often find that the sentences I conclude with often belong at the start of the piece (and things might need a brisk reorder and edit.) Often things write themselves backwards, if that makes sense!

I know you write a lot every day so how do you find the motivation to write extra on top of that?

I think that if you want to write well, you have to write often. I’ve certainly found that my writing has improved in leaps and bounds, not only via writing consistently, but also via reading great books and hearing other writers talk about their work.

I’ve always, always felt compelled to write regularly and prolifically. Apparently I have things to say! My great grandfather, Frank Boreham, was the same. He wrote over 50 books – selling millions of copies – as well as penning hundreds of editorials for The Age and The Mercury newspapers. I think my urge to write is in the genes! I can’t fight it! I thank Frank for that.

What are the lessons you’ve learned about the book-writing process over the years?

I’ve learnt so many things! I’ve always worked with wonderful editors, so I’m all about letting go a bit and letting the experts help me to tighten up and simplify my words. I’ve also been lucky enough to work with several great photographers (John Laurie, Tim James and Julie Renouf) and designers/stylists (Michelle Mackintosh and Ortolan.) They’ve shown me how wonderful the collaborative process can be. I think it’s easy to get hung up on having as much creative control as possible, but it’s very important to loosen up a bit sometimes and let others work their magic alongside your good ideas.

I’ve also learnt that it’s important to NOT wait until the night before your book’s publicity tour begins to read it from cover to cover again – especially if the first interview is breakfast radio – because you might be up half the night marveling at how your book actually isn’t half bad and a bit exhausted the next day! Better to do that first-since-published re-read as soon as it arrives in the post, I think!

I’ve learnt that I work best if I write almost every day. Five days a week, minimum, works well for me. It keeps me writing naturally and stops me from overthinking the words or writing too sentimentally.

What are the shortcuts you’ve figured out over the years?

I’ve got a snazzy shortcut for creating a framework for a book. This is helpful for people who want to try writing a book, but aren’t sure where to start. I used this method to write my most recent book. It goes like this:

  • Choose your subject or storyline.
  • Write ten or twelve MUST KNOW (or MUST DISCUSS) points or plot events to fit that subject or storyline.
  • Turn each of those points or events into a chapter title (they can just be working titles at this stage).
  • Write 1000 or so words on each of those chapters (or slot in writing you have already done where it ‘belongs’, under the relevant point or event).
  • Try to write for at least an hour, five days a week. Just get the words down, however they come out.
  • Re-read, rewrite, edit.
  • Repeat as needed!

What do you do with your blog when you write? Is it kept at the same frequency?

I do keep blogging pretty consistently when I’m writing a book, because the more I write, the easier it is to write. I find that when I don’t have a lot of writing work on, the words come less freely. This is part of why I love Julia Cameron’s writing exercise The Morning Pages (from her book The Artist’s Way.) The Morning Pages set the daily task of writing quite a significant amount, long-hand, just for the sake of writing.

I find it’s a great way to stay in shape during the ‘off season’, so to speak! It encourages me to get whatever is in my head (quite messily) down on the page and has a magical way of loosening up the cogs, making writing much easier and more natural for me. I recommend this method to all my blogging students too.

In short: if you want to write well, write more and write daily.

What about social media? How do you keep on top of that, given you’re a personal blog and you can’t exactly hire people to be “you”?

I tend to use social media for sharing others’ work as much as my own. I use CoSchedule to share my own posts to social media. It’s such a great plugin and I’m a huge fan. You can create your social posts and schedule them from within your WordPress post editing window. I do this when I’m finished writing my post, so it’s part of my editorial workflow rather than a pesky ‘extra step’. Then the plugin does the job for you – sharing to Twitter or Facebook in whichever way you’ve asked it to. So streamlined and simple to use! Elephant stamp in the time-saving department for CoSchedule!

I then make sure I check in and monitor/reply to anyone who’s nice enough to talk to me on Facebook or Twitter. It only takes a few minutes a couple of times a day and it means that followers aren’t just yelling into the void (to quote Grace & Frankie!)

When it comes to sharing great stuff other people are doing, I have all my favourite reads on Feedly so I can enjoy the in one time-saving window. I then share the best of my Feedly reading, loading them up in Buffer with a chatty comment, an image and a tag for the great-stuff-creator where possible. Buffer sends them out to my custom schedule and using Feedly and Buffer together is a great time saver (you can also share directly from within Feedly if you like but I prefer to share on the actual Buffer platform as I like the interface.)

How do you know when to say yes to a book?

I think a great publishing deal comes down to working with good people. If you have a great rapport with a publisher, if they’ve got a great track record, if they’re prepared to give you a bit of room to move (so you can have a bit of creative freedom when you’re writing) and a great royalty then chances are it’s a ‘yes’!

It’s also good to know what marketing and distribution ideas they might have for your book, as well as any design vision they might be considering. Then you can see if everyone’s on the same page (!) and if your book will have the support it needs to stand out from the pack.

I’d definitely go for a great royalty over a big advance if you have to choose. I’ve heard people splash around big advance figures – but you’ve got to earn that money back in book sales. A big advance = big pressure! So look for the best royalty rate you can get. The Australian Society of Authors (ASA) recommends at least 10% – but you may find that as a first time author it will be lower than that.

I’d also do my homework and ask for help – perhaps by engaging a literary agent (because they’re smart when it comes to digital rights and other ever-changing details) and joining the ASA so that you can find out more about what goes into making a great book.


Has it convinced you that you can make some time in your schedule around blogging to finally get started on that book? What are you writing about?

Stacey Roberts is the Managing Editor of a writer, blogger, and full-time word nerd balancing it all with being a stay-at-home mum. She writes about all this and more at Veggie Mama. Chat with her on Twitter @veggie_mama or be entertained on Facebook.

Reading Roundup: What’s New in Blogging Lately

Reading Roundup: What's new in blogging this week /

Your news – this week expanded, as requested! I hope there’s something here that you will find helpful.

6 Tips to Improve Your Facebook Posts // Social Media Examiner

And now I want a bread bowl filled with cheese.

8 Lesser-Known Strategies to Get More out of LinkedIn // Mashable

Have you had much luck with LinkedIn? You might now!

Top 10 Wins for Getting Started Fast with Facebook Video // Buffer

With 300 hours of viewable video posted every minute, you’re going to need to know how to stand out.

Press Publish: Matt Thompson on The Atlantic’s Attempt to Breathe Life into Classic Blogging // NiemanLab

A podcast discussing the current conversation that blogging is going through a period of reinvigoration and what is to become of it. They say “It’s an interesting attempt to recapture some of the looser, voicier, more conversational structures of the early 2000s — some of which has been lost in the rise of social media and commercialized online news.” and I was interested to hear how it’s worked for them.

The Top 1o Ways to Make Money Online with Integrity // Lewis Howes

Do you do any of these? I like how Lewis advises to make money by doing it “the right way that both serves your vision and supports others”. That’s a win-win.

How to Stay Consistent // Chalene Johnson

Probably my worst habit is being inconsistent. I know everything would move a lot smoother if I did it properly, and cultivated good habits. But at least I’m holding myself accountable, which is her second point.

9 Ways to Improve your Pinterest Marketing // Social Media Examiner

I hear number 4 works exceptionally well, and it’s got me thinking about something I’ve been meaning to do for a while now. Number 9 is always good – I just wish I was that clever!

How to Simplify Your Blogging Life with Tsh Oxenreider // The Blog Maven

One of my favourite topics with one of my favourite people. Don’t miss this episode.

How to Self-Publish Your Own Books as a Business Model // By Regina

Don’t wait for publishers to come to you! There’s plenty of information available to help you DIY. This is a great perspective on making it part of your overall monetisation strategy.

The iPhone Will Finally Get a Taco Emoji with iOS 9.1 // Mashable

And all my emoji dreams have come true.


What have you read this week that’s caught your eye? I’d love to hear!

Stacey Roberts is the Managing Editor of a writer, blogger, and full-time word nerd balancing it all with being a stay-at-home mum. She writes about all this and more at Veggie Mama. Chat with her on Twitter @veggie_mama or be entertained on Facebook.

How To Create Great Content For Your Blog – Q&A, Part 2

How To Create Great Content For Your Blog – Q&A, Part 2

Episode 43 of the ProBlogger podcast is part two of the Q&A series I’ve been doing on how to create great content for your blog (episode one is here). In it, I answer your most recent questions from the callout I put on the ProBlogger Facebook page about:

  • What are my three best blog posts ever and why they worked
  • What type of content I find most resonates with my audience, and whether I think video or the written word is more important and why
  • When I first started taking on paid writers, how I recruited them and how I added them to the schedule
  • What I think the pros and cons of outsourcing blog content are
  • Whether or not I believe there an optimal length or word count for a blog

I hope the answers are useful to you – I cover the post I almost didn’t publish but garnered more than 700,000 views, posts that get high traffic and how I keep them going across social media over time, my thoughts on video and audio content (especially in terms of audience and SEO), how I feel incorporating writers both brings value and dilutes your brand, the system we use for hiring new writers and editors, and the length of posts we’ve been publishing that make the most impact on our readership.

You can find episode 43 and the show notes at – would love to get your feedback.

Further Reading: