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Looking For Online Revenue Bloggers – ReveNews

ReveNews is a trusted, unbiased source focusing on Internet related industries such as online marketing, SEM, affiliate marketing, retail (e-commerce), analytics, spyware, blogging and much more. ReveNews authors consist of highly respected thinkers, commentators and business people who have real experience and insight. ReveNews readers include industry gurus, top-level executives and CEO’s, plus many of the industry’s top net-repreneurs; all coming together to create a global Internet community to distribute, discuss and analyze the industry at hand.

Interested in writing for us? Applications are being accepted now.

“I was standing in line at an industry show when someone grabbed my arm and introduced themselves saying they read my blog at ReveNews all the time and wanted to ask a question. Turns out it was a senior developer from Google. He couldn’t say enough about the good things he reads on our site. Pretty cool. And a nice contact to have in the future.” – Wayne Porter, ReveNews Blogger

FeedBurner Stats PRO–It’s a great value and valuable!

FeedBurner chartIt’s been over a week since I turned FeedBurner’s Stats PRO on for View from the Isle’s feed.  The chart at the right shows the data for the post about trying Stats PRO on View from the Isle.  So, what do I think?  Well, it isn’t perfect, but it is a keeper and worth the $5/mo.  Since without it you can’t tell what content is most popular from your feed only gross circulation numbers, this add-on is required.  Oh course you don’t really get your maximum value unless you are at the maximum feeds per cost unit.  So I’m tracking three feeds for $5, which is better than 1 feed for $5.
 
There are limitations to this data set.  It doesn’t, it can’t, include direct links to your post from other sites.  It only tracks that pass through the feed (like Technorati).  So you still need your Blogware or TypePad stats as well.  Also you’ll notice the steep drop-off in this article’s data.  I’ve found this pattern repeated for all my other articles, but if I look at my Blogware stats there is a stronger baseline persistence.  This is the direct link gap.
 
Which brings me to my concluding point.  There is a real market here for holistic blog stats.  Something that really pulls these two data sets together.  Frankly, I think leaders like TypePad and Blogware should be licensing the API and providing this service to their subscribers.  I’d really like to only have one place to check stats every day.
 
FeedBurner Stats PRO.  I like it, I’m going to pay for it, but it has room to grow.  There needs to be some better connectors to my blog’s data and a little more detail in the link data.  Still it is a nice improvement.
 

Tris Hussey is a professional blogger and blog consultant, the Chief Blogging Officer for Qumana Software, and Managing Director of Qumana Services.  He can be reached at tris AT qumana DOT com or tris AT trishussey DOT com.
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What If No One Answered The Call?

Last week I published a post on moving the discussion to conversion. Thinking about that post and associated comments a bit earlier, a related thought crossed my mind – What is no one answered your call to action?

What if no one ever bought, no one ever registered, no one ever clicked? What if all you ever got from your blogging was the satisfaction of knowing an audience of readers thought your blog was interesting – interesting enough to read and comment occasionally, but not interesting enough to heed your call to action.

Would you still post? Why?

More thoughts on defining blog (but much more intelligently put!)

It seems my “I goofed” post, or rather my attempt to explain the difference between a web site and a blog has got some folks thinking. Taughnee at endeavor creative (do you have any idea how hard it is for a Canadian to spell endeavor? I spell in endeavOUr every time!) has a very interesting, totally relevant story to share. It’s a fun read too.

EDIT: URI is fixed.

Blog Saturation? Is it still bleeding edge?

At work we do a bit of blogging. My boss still doesn’t really grasp the concept of what a blog is, but now he wants to host blogs for a niche group. The problem is, he doesn’t think anyone knows what a blog is and doesn’t want to use the word “blog” in the title. Perhaps in the tagline.

It seems to me “blog” is reaching saturation. It was the word of the year last year and there are just to many people blogging for people not to know. But the real question I guess is really do they know that the word “blog” is what kind of sites they’ve been seeing a lot of lately. With the popularity of MSN Spaces, Blogger.com, Typepad and others, is the word “blog” that important in letting people know that’s what we are offering?

In the next few weeks we’ll be rolling it out and I was just wondering how important the word “blog” is to the branding of “blog hosting” and describing what it is.

What Kind of ProBlogger Are You?

I recently wrote an article, Solo Blogging vs Network Blogging, which is a follow-up to the quiz: Are You A Solo Blogger Or A Network Blogger?

In the quiz, I identified four main problogger categories:

  • Solo Bloggers – Those who set up their own blog/s and try to earn money this way.
  • Network Bloggers – Those who are ‘hired’ by (or joined) a blogging network or two.
  • Bi-Bloggers (I know, the name sounds a bit strange, but, ah well…) – Those who set up their own blog and join a blogging network or two.
  • Trailblazing Bloggers – Those who may either set up their own blog, blog for a network and/or run their own blogging networks.

My own blogging history shows that I began as a solo blogger. Then, I started blogging and writing for the “megablog” (Darren’s words, not mine) , About.com. (Hence, I became a bi-blogger.) And recently, I started my own network.

What about you? What kind of problogger are you?

Link blogs and RSS feeds

Over the last few days, besides going to the sensational State of Origin match last night, I’ve been playing with a new (for me) blog tool. Using del.icio.us and RSS Digest, I have set up feeds off my blog where I can show the headings of articles and blog posts I read and think others might like to read.
This was all pretty simple to do, and free (though RSS Digest is donorware – and a great service), but will it prove to be any use to anyone but me?
Linkblogs are, of course, a good way to keep track of your own reading and work as an external brain (as the jargon du jour goes) and adding an RSS feed is just an easy extra step.
What do you think about this sort of stuff – does it add to blogs or just clutter up the sidebar?

The difference between a website and a blog

This is not directly related to problogging as such, but it’s an insight we can probably all relate to. This is cross posted from The Blog Studio, making this an act of shameless self promotion. But its too good not to share, so I’m going against my better (sober) judgement and posting it here too. Sorry Darren, I hope you’ll forgive me!

I get this question all the time: “what’s the difference between a web site and a blog?”

What it comes down to is this:

A company has a website. That website talks to customers.

A person has a blog. That blog talks to people.

It’s a matter of attitude, not of technology.

Yes, this is a gross oversimplification. But it gets right to the heart of the matter.

Blogs Must Earn Their Keep

Sounds like Darren is having a wonderful time on his well deserved holiday. From a ProBlogger fan, it’s been great fun reading the variety of posts by guest bloggers.

Over the past few months, I’ve been talking to marketers around the country about how blogs can support business initiatives. Most folks are intrigued and want to explore ways to incorporate this new tool into their strategies. However for some the deal breaker is how to justify to their management that blogs are not a resource drain.

If blogs are going to be accepted as a credible marketing tactic they must be able to earn their keep within a company’s master marketing plan. Let’s save the “people talk” for blog conversations. In “marketing talk” that means accountability. As with any interactive strategy “blog” metrics can be tracked and ROI can be established. Compliments of Diva Marketing here are a few suggestions.

Blog Specific
*May be measured by unique or total posts

-Search rankings
-Visitor hits*
-Page views
-Trackbacks *
-In bound links – general*
-In bound links – “high ranked” blogs/sites*
-Comments* such as customer feedback/new ideas
- Newsreader subscriptions

Conversions
- Newsletters subscriptions
- Sales
- Leads
- White paper/other down loads

Buzz
- Speaking engagements
- Podcasts, vlogs and other interviews
- Media mentions/quotes
- Mentions and links on other blogs/websites

Intangibles
- Customers’ emotional involvement with the brand
- Increase in brand loyalty
- Providing customers with the opportunity to talk with people within a company and ensuring that customers are heard, responded to and respected by those people who are assuming the role of the public “voice” of their company.