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Blogging at work

I just read Blogging On The Boss’ Time and it got me thinking, how many of us “Probloggers” who still have day jobs blog from work? I know many companies are starting to monitor blogging activity, but part of my job is actually blogging at work. But I find at times I’m blogging on my own sites. Usually I restrict this to very short posts, slow times, or something that just can’t wait. I’ll often post something at lunch, but that’s my time.

Personally, I try to blog whenever I can but I try not to take advantage of my employer. I don’t want to get dooced, after all. So, I thought I would ask, how many of you post from work (your day job) and does your company have a blogging policy?

Blogging Data We Can All Learn From

The BlogKits 2005 Blogging & Advertising Survey is about to close up. Here’s the best part. I’m going to release the raw data from this study on ProBlogger.net next week for anyone to download and analyze as they see fit. So if you haven’t taken the short survey yet, please do, it will benefit us all in the end. There’s some amazing data in there.

Here’s a sneak peek. 80% of bloggers agree that advertisements are ok on their own blogs. 16% of those who answered were neutral on the statement, with a measly 4% or less saying they don’t think ads should be on their blog. I know for a fact that number was probably less than 30% just two years ago.

On the same note, 76% of bloggers feel that their readers are also ok with ads on blogs. While 15% stayed neutral, only 9% or thought different. Who reads blogs? Well, a lot of bloggers read other blogs. So it’s safe to assume that bloggers are also blog readers.

Finally, one of my most favorite questions. “I am more likely to click on an ad in a blog that I enjoy reading?” 84% of the respondents agreed to this question, while 10% stayed neutral and less than 6% disagreed. Seems like common sense right? The data would concur with that statement.

Blogging Domain Name Brand Mantra

Darren asks, ‘What’s in A Blog Name?‘. He’s right, a name is a very important piece of becoming a successful blog. Think branding…it’s all about branding. Certain names and words flow off the tounge and are more memorable than others.

I’ve been reading Darren’s blog before it was ProBlogger.net. What was it? Um, something like blog.livingroom.com.au, I think. Get the point? That name sucked. Sorry Darren, I think you knew that. That’s no way to build a brand name. I think Darren can prove that his traffic and general reputation grew by leaps and bounds when he moved to ProBlogger.net. The design helped too :) Of course, it can be done, but it’s much harder.

So as a serious blogger…if you want to be serious, and taken seriously, you have to stop using those unbrandable blog domains like supercooldude.blogspot.com. The time has come to drop $8.95 at GoDaddy and get your own domain name. Or, for the sake of this shameless promotional entry, you could use one of mine below.

I’m currently looking to either sell or develop the following domain names. If you are interested in either offer, please email me at [email protected]

www.hotelblog.com
I’m looking for a writer who wants to take it and make it into a network blog about hotels. I’m willing to pay up to 75% of all revenue it generates to the right person who can make it a success. I’d host it, and provide the MT blog software and setup. I’d also do the design and any tech stuff. All this person would have to do is write, well… and often.

I also have these domains I’d like to do something with. Either sell them or develop them. Have an idea? Make an offer? Let me know.

News-blog.com
College-blog.com
Career-blog.com
Business-blog.com
Blogbucks.com
Blog-shop.com
Biz-blog.com

Blog Business Summit II Aug 17-19, San Francisco

Just announced today the Blog Business Summit will be August 17-19 in San Francisco.  I’m not sure if I will be attending–I will be at Gnomedex later this month though–but it was a great time in January.  BBS was the break out conference for me and Susie.  BBS was where both of our blogs got attention for our event blogging.  So, if nothing else for new pro bloggers, a conference like BBS, Gnomedex, or BlogHER. is the perfect place to network, meet other probloggers and, if you’re lucky, get some attention.  Oh yeah, have some fun too. ;-).
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Interview with ‘Make Easy Money with Google’ Author

Rick has an Interview with Eric Giguere the author of Make Easy Money with Google. Here’s just one of the questions and answers:

’4) How much money can one expect to make doing this? and how much time do I have to put into it?

Ah, there’s the rub. As I say in the introduction, I didn’t title this book “Make Oodles and Oodles of Money with Google”. Some sites do make a lot of money. But those sites have been around for a long time and have developed a steady stream of traffic. Realistically, I would expect most people using AdSense make from $25-$250 a month with it, probably most of them on the lower end. So it’s not a lot of money. But there’s always potential there to make more if you can get the traffic up. Which I think is directly proportional to how much time you spend working on the site. But you can certainly create a site that pays for itself without a lot of hassle. And don’t forget there may be tax advantages – you’re running a business now, after all, and you can maybe deduct certain expenses that you couldn’t before. (Like I say in the book, see a tax professional for proper advice.)’

Looks like an interesting read – I’ll be interested to see how much of what Eric covers is ‘new’ information and not the standard tips that can be found for free online. If anyone buys it – let us know what you think – I’d love to publish a review.

Corporate Bloggers earn $40k – $70k

There is an article in the WSJ today on how Blogging is becoming a Corporate Job for an increasing number of people:

‘In its short lifespan, blogging has largely been a freewheeling exercise in online self-expression. Now it is also becoming a corporate job.

A small but growing number of businesses are hiring people to write blogs, otherwise known as Web logs, or frequently updated online journals. Companies are looking for candidates who can write in a conversational style about timely topics that would appeal to customers, clients and potential recruits.’

Duncan points out that the jobs mentioned pay between $40,000 and $70,000 ($US) per year.

I’m not sure what the average wage in in the average wage is in the US but considering exchange rates it would put an Aussie on between $52,000 and $91,000 which at the lower end is around the average Aussie wage (from the last figures I saw) to a pretty decent income at the upper end.

Building Blogging Relationships – Positioning Yourself at the Watercooler

This is another post in the building blogging relationships series.

I remember reading two studies a number of years ago that taught me about the power of positioning in social networks when it comes to relationships.

One study did research into who the most well connected, social and relational people were on a floor of offices. The study found that people whose desks were close to highly trafficked areas in an office were those who were best connected with others on the floor. Generally these people were close to entrances, elevators, water coolers or recreational areas etc.

The second study did similar research into which household on streets were most connected in the neighborhood. Once again the research found that it was people who lived on the corners of two streets that disproportionately were more connected and relational than others in the street.

I’ve been pondering these two studies recently and wondering how they might give us some clues about being connected and relational bloggers. I’m not sure exactly where these ‘water cooler’, ‘street corner’ places are in the wider blogging community – but I suspect they exist and are emerging. I’d be very interested to get your opinions on where such places might actually be?

Perhaps some of these places might include:

- discussion forums – I know I’ve started some very interesting relationships with other bloggers through forums – they are a place where people actually come to learn, discuss, share etc

- other blogs - Some of my best blogging buddies were made as i read other blogs comments sections. Sometimes something someone says makes so much sense that it’s worth checking out there blog and getting in touch. I guess it’s some of the bigger blogs where you can make the most connections with others.

- group blogs – I’ve not really gotten to involved in these – but blogs like linkfilter and blog critics seem to be places where community can be built and bloggers get to know each other.

It strikes me that these sorts of places might help position you to be more visible as a blogger and lead you into some interesting communities where relationships with other bloggers might emerge. Where else would you suggest?

Read the rest of the building blogging relationships series.

Building Blogging Relationships

After writing Blogging in Formation – Lessons from a Goose I decided to continue the theme of building blogging relationships with a series of posts on that topic. Here is a central index of the posts I’ve done so far:

- Building Blogging Relationships – Attitude
- Availability and Accessibility
- Be a Good Guest
- Be a Good Host
- Positioning yourself at the Water Cooler
- Using Email
- Blog Projects and Memes

Meeting James Farmer

I had a morning coffee today with a fellow Melbourne blogger, James Farmer who blogs at incorporated subversion.

What an interesting and far reaching conversation (well we stuck to blogging – but there was a lot to say) as we discussed everything from Educational Blogging (his main focus), to the BlogTalk Downunder conference (I really want to go – just working out if it is going to work out in the craziness of the next few weeks), to Multi Authoring Weblog tools (stay tuned for a post on this) and to miscellaneous topics in between.

I love meeting bloggers, especially those with a niche focus like James – I always come away with a new perspective, ideas and approaches to my own niche/s.

I think I need to do this more.