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PR Blogger Builds Profile and Lands Job

Popular PR Blogger, Steve Rubel, has just announced that he’s moving from CooperKatz to new employer at Edelman. While I’m sure there’s more to it than just his blog (a lot more), it’s been fascinating to see how Steve has used Micro Persuasion over the last 20 months since it’s beginnings to raise the profile not only of his company but also himself. In doing so he’s marketed himself as an expert in his field brilliantly and it’s no wonder that he’s in demand. Yet another way of making a living from blogging (more indirectly than running ads – but still well worth exploring). Congratulations Steve.

What’s a Blog Post Worth?

Wired News has a mini interview with Harold Davis from Googleplex (which doesn’t seem to have any content on it today for some reason) which has some good basic information on making a living from blogging.

Interestingly he puts a dollar value on a per page basis(over a year) to blogging:

‘As for money, people who are really in the business of making a living off content pages say they average about $10 a page per year. That would be a pretty good average. Usually, it’s not enough to make a living on, but it’s a good supplement.’

I’d actually not considered measuring income in terms of a per page basis. I’m not sure it’s a terribly good measure because it would vary so much depending upon the level of traffic that you get to your page per year and the topic of the page (and the resulting click value in AdSense) but it’s an interesting one to calculate.

Here at ProBlogger I’d say that my figures are well and truly under the $10 per year per post figure (they are probably a third of it) but on some of my other blogs they are much higher. In fact overall my blogs I’d say it’d be a conservative estimate.

Buyings and Selling Blogs

There is a couple of worthwhile podcasts over at SavvysoloCast which are a conversation between Yaro Starak and Michael Pollock talking through the topic of Buying and Selling Blogs. The conversation is based upon the sale of Small Business Branding (bought by Yaro from Michael) where both guys talk through some of the considerations they made on their side of the transaction (including the price paid – towards the end of Part 2). Listen to the conversation in two parts – Part 1 and Part 2.

2006 Trend Predictions in Social Commerce

Interesting post over at Micro Persuasion on the topic of 2006 Trends to Watch Part II: Social Commerce where he makes the following prediction:

‘Watch for sites like Amazon, Froogle and Yahoo to develop turnkey stores that can be integrated into blogs. This will take affiliate programs to the next level. It’s also possible that some electronic commerce sites will partner with the major blogging platforms to make co-branded social commerce even easier.’

Wise insights there from Steve. I think many commercial blogs have vast untapped earning potential without avenues to sell products in partnerships with online retailers. I know this is one of the things I’ll be investigating further in 2006. In fact I’ve already had one online retailer make contact to talk potential collaboration.

As Steve says this will take affiliate earnings to a whole new level.

TypePad Pro Turning In To ‘Real Pros’

It just came to my attention that bloggers with TypePad Pro accounts can now earn money from their blogs via an integrated service from Kanoodle, a contextual advertising company. They have one tiny catch, though: Earnings for the first 90 days can only go towards future TypePad subscription payments. It’s only after 90 days that bloggers can obtain or spend their money via PayPal.

Anyway, apparently, this is just the beginning. Six Apart is planning to integrate other ways to help TypePad bloggers to turn pro, including adding Tip Jars.

I blogged about this at Weblogs.About.com, but I thought I’d share it here as well seeing as this is all about pro-blogging.

Now, I’m just wondering if anyone here has a TypePad Pro account who can talk more about this? Yes, even though I have a batallion of blog accounts, I’m not subscribed to TypePad.

I wonder how many other blog services will follow this practice?

Marketers are turning to blogs for online ad spending

Research out of Forrester is showing a growing interest to place advertisements on blogs and/or in RSS feeds. This should be no surprise, given the mainstream business coverage of blogs that has issued recently.

Of those surveyed by Forrester, 64% would be interested in advertising on blogs, while 57% would be interested in advertising through RSS. Both these figures represent more interest than advertising on mobile devices – this just shows which way the industry is set to grow.

Forrester estimates that total online advertising and marketing dollars will reach $14.7 billion for the 2005 year – that’s 23% more than in 2004. Banners/sponsorships will grow 11% per year to $8 billion by 2010. We’ll also see a large increase in spending for search engine marketing over the next few years, up to $11.6 billion by 2010. Online marketing spending is the only area of growth in advertising spending as a whole – so interest is definitely present.
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Canadian Professional Blogging Podcast: No. 1 On becoming a professional blogger

podcastWelcome to the first Canadian Professional Blogging Podcast with me, Tris Hussey, and Arieanna Foley. This is the recording I mentioned on Friday. The delay was worth the wait because we got permission to use some music from The Kitchen for the intro and outro music for the podcast. We’re using “Flow” which is available for download on the website.
 
Canadapodcasts.ca
The topic for our discussion is how Arieanna and I became professional bloggers and a little about professional blogging itself. Imagine us sitting across a kitchen table sipping coffee or bourbon (Arieanna) or Scotch (me) chatting. In reality we’re over 50 miles apart, separated by the Straight of Georgia. Look for more of these really soon. Arieanna’s been bitten by the podcasting bug now too.
 
The Show: Podcast linkcpbp_no1_going_pro.mp3 –3.73 megs 16 mins, 18 seconds
 
Show notes:
Intro and outro music – Josh Hundert and The Kitchen
 
The show was recorded via Skype and HotRecorder with post-production with Audacity and Winamp .
 
 
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Blogging Data We Can All Learn From

The BlogKits 2005 Blogging & Advertising Survey is about to close up. Here’s the best part. I’m going to release the raw data from this study on ProBlogger.net next week for anyone to download and analyze as they see fit. So if you haven’t taken the short survey yet, please do, it will benefit us all in the end. There’s some amazing data in there.

Here’s a sneak peek. 80% of bloggers agree that advertisements are ok on their own blogs. 16% of those who answered were neutral on the statement, with a measly 4% or less saying they don’t think ads should be on their blog. I know for a fact that number was probably less than 30% just two years ago.

On the same note, 76% of bloggers feel that their readers are also ok with ads on blogs. While 15% stayed neutral, only 9% or thought different. Who reads blogs? Well, a lot of bloggers read other blogs. So it’s safe to assume that bloggers are also blog readers.

Finally, one of my most favorite questions. “I am more likely to click on an ad in a blog that I enjoy reading?” 84% of the respondents agreed to this question, while 10% stayed neutral and less than 6% disagreed. Seems like common sense right? The data would concur with that statement.

Trying FeedBurner Total Stats Pro on View from the Isle

headerlogo.jpgYeah, I admit it, I’m a metrics junky.  Which is good, since I am the chief blogger for Elytics.com writing on the web metrics blog.  Regardless, I’m also a huge fan of FeedBurner.  I admit I check my FeedBurner stats throughout the day, especially when one of my articles has been picked up by several other blogs.  In spite of being a metrics junky and really wanting to know what content is popular on my blog I resisted trying Total Stats PRO–Burning Questions – The Official FeedBurner Weblog – FeedBurner – FeedBurner Total Stats PRO.  Why?  I’m cost conscious.  I really try to keep my business overhead low.  Then it hit me, as a blog consultant/pro blogger/syndicated writer I really should look into this.  I already set up all my clients with FeedBurner from day one–learning from my own mistake–and I tell my clients check your FeedBurner and other stats to figure out what content is most popular and use this to help guide your content decisions.  It makes logical sense, then, that I should try it myself and see if it’s worth $5/month.  So, over the next 15 days I’ll be checking my stats with Total Stats PRO.  I’ll probably do an initial assessment later today, then one in a few days, etc.
 
As professional bloggers our content is both our calling card and our gravy train.  It’s how we earn our money.  There’s no point in writing tons of articles on topic x if those aren’t as popular as topic y, especially if you’re writing for a client.  There will always be a certain number of articles that you write or publish, things like press releases, that aren’t glamorous and don’t get a lot of attention, but are essential regardless.  Then there are the articles which both you and your client intend to be interesting to a wider audience, those are the articles that I’m talking about.  That’s the important information that I hope FeedBurner can now provide me.  If so, $5/month could be a paltry price to pay to be able to effectively target the content published on a blog by blog basis.  Here’s hoping!
 
I will post charts, tables, etc as appropriate to give you a feel for what I’m seeing.  Because great data poorly presented, is almost as useless as not having it at all.
 
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Tris Hussey is a professional blogger and blog consultant, the Chief Blogging Officer for Qumana Software, and Managing Director of Qumana Services.  He can be reached at tris AT qumana DOT com or tris AT trishussey DOT com.
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