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What Makes a Good Guest Blogger?

If ProBlogger was a real estate property, it can probably be likened to a snazzy professional suite in a condo. Top floor – latest furnishings and decor — hip, business-like, but with a comfy feel to it — and a nice view of the world around it.

So, when Darren first invited me to become a guest blogger here at ProBlogger, I was honoured and pleased. It felt like being invited in to someone’s home – someone’s personal space – and genuinely telling me to make myself at home.

And, with just a few “house rules” to follow, I can do just about anything else as Darren’s guest. I can sip peach iced tea in the jacuzzi in a red bikini. I can jump up and down on the water bed. And best of all, I can talk to all his friends and colleagues who come by to see him on a regular basis. Many of whom probably don’t give squat about seeing me anyway. They’re not here for me. You’re not here for me.

But, it doesn’t matter. Darren’s just happy to introduce me and to let me in on the fun. And I think that’s nice.

Nice people deserve nice things. That’s why I wanted to be a good house guest. From the beginning, I kept thinking about what makes a good guest blogger. Even though I had guest bloggers on my own blogs, I’ve never been one. And Darren’s post, ProBlogger – Reflections on Guest Blogging – and the comments that followed – made me think even harder about this.

So, I took notes. Based on comments by ProBlogger readers, these are some of the things that make a good guest blogger:

1) Good guests want to give – not get. We should not guest blog because of what we’ll get out of it, but what we can give to our “host” – and everyone else invited. It’s up to the host, the other guests, and everyone else how they’d like to say ‘thank you’ in return. We don’t impose our ‘thank yous’ through blatant self promotion.

2) Good guests follow house rules. Both the official ones – and the unwritten ones.

3) Good guests like to offer fresh entertainment. No one wants to hear the same joke and story repeated more than once.

4) Good guests keep their promises. We should do what we said we’d do.

Hmmm… So, what else do you think make good guests/guest bloggers?

In any case, it’s almost time to pack up and end the month-long party. I really enjoyed my stay. Thanks! It was nice to meet some of you who managed to say hello. I hope you’ll stay in touch.

And, no matter how much fun I had guest blogging here, I’m looking forward to seeing more of Darren around this snazzy place called ProBlogger.

TypePad Pro Turning In To ‘Real Pros’

It just came to my attention that bloggers with TypePad Pro accounts can now earn money from their blogs via an integrated service from Kanoodle, a contextual advertising company. They have one tiny catch, though: Earnings for the first 90 days can only go towards future TypePad subscription payments. It’s only after 90 days that bloggers can obtain or spend their money via PayPal.

Anyway, apparently, this is just the beginning. Six Apart is planning to integrate other ways to help TypePad bloggers to turn pro, including adding Tip Jars.

I blogged about this at Weblogs.About.com, but I thought I’d share it here as well seeing as this is all about pro-blogging.

Now, I’m just wondering if anyone here has a TypePad Pro account who can talk more about this? Yes, even though I have a batallion of blog accounts, I’m not subscribed to TypePad.

I wonder how many other blog services will follow this practice?

What Kind of ProBlogger Are You?

I recently wrote an article, Solo Blogging vs Network Blogging, which is a follow-up to the quiz: Are You A Solo Blogger Or A Network Blogger?

In the quiz, I identified four main problogger categories:

  • Solo Bloggers – Those who set up their own blog/s and try to earn money this way.
  • Network Bloggers – Those who are ‘hired’ by (or joined) a blogging network or two.
  • Bi-Bloggers (I know, the name sounds a bit strange, but, ah well…) – Those who set up their own blog and join a blogging network or two.
  • Trailblazing Bloggers – Those who may either set up their own blog, blog for a network and/or run their own blogging networks.

My own blogging history shows that I began as a solo blogger. Then, I started blogging and writing for the “megablog” (Darren’s words, not mine) , About.com. (Hence, I became a bi-blogger.) And recently, I started my own network.

What about you? What kind of problogger are you?