Close
Close

Blogs for Lawyers

Feedmelegal> has a good post on how blogs can be useful for lawyers.

‘How can lawyers benefit from the use of weblogs? Feedmelegal does not intend to repeat at length what has been written by others, but to summarise and to an extent build on the insightful thinking that has already emerged, as follows:

· given their ease of use, and in conjunction with webfeeds which drive new content into the global blogosphere, blogs enable lawyers to carve a visible niche for themselves in their chosen areas of expertise or specialism (how many lawyers out there are experts or specialised in particular fields but do not market the fact, properly or at all?);

· they can be used for multiple marketing purposes and the sharing of knowledge, from an individual lawyer’s blog, to a practice or industry group blog, to a firm blog;’

Read more at Weblogs: A Primer for Lawyers>

Blogging for Dollars – CFO Magazine – October Issue 2004 – CFO.com

It seems that articles about how executives are blogging are appearing every day now – here is another one – Blogging for Dollars

‘Once the domain of the disgruntled and demented, Web logs are being embraced by business executive…

In an earlier time, say 2000, managers at Microsoft didn’t appear to be such big fans of blogs. Actually, few corporate executives were. Back then, the personal Web pages gave a free and open voice to customers and ex-employees — too often, irate customers and disgruntled ex-employees. In some cases, corporations went to court to try to get business-bashing bloggers to cease and desist….

Things have changed. Blogs, once the domain of the malcontent, have gone mainstream, thanks in large part to the thousands of Web logs dedicated to celebrities and defunct TV shows (“Buffy” bloggers, you know who you are). In the process, business leaders have come to value what they once feared about Web logs: these online diaries provide an easy way to reach a large audience. Venture capitalists, for example, now use Web logs to uncover inventors and entrepreneurs with promising new ideas. Corporate directors, including those at enterprise resource planning giant SAP, have launched blogs to help them better communicate with stakeholders. And managers at some companies, including Sun Microsystems, use blogs (among other approaches) to talk to employees and let employees talk to one another.’ Read more at Blogging for Dollars

Study: Growth in Worldwide Ad Spend Led by Internet

Online expenditure on Advertising is expected to continue to rise according to this report:

‘U.K.-based media research firm ZenithOptimedia expects the growth of Internet ad expenditures to outpace other media worldwide, while advertiser confidence holds steady.

According to ZenithOptimedia’s quarterly global ad forecast, over the next two years, newspapers, magazines, radio and outdoor advertising are expected to lose about 0.1 percent of share each, while cinema will hold steady. Meanwhile, TV will gain 0.1 percent of share while the Internet adds 0.5 percent, according to the forecast.

Internet advertising has accounted for 3.5 percent of display advertising revenue this year, compared with 3.2 percent in 2003. ZenithOptimedia expects it to account for 3.7 percent in 2005 and 4.0 percent in 2006. By contrast, television leads other media in 2004 with a 37.6 percent share, followed by newspapers with 29.9 percent, magazines with 13.5 percent, radio with 8.8 percent, and outdoor with 5.3 percent. Global Internet advertising leads only cinema, which holds a 0.4 percent share.’

Read More at
Study: Growth in Worldwide Ad Spend Led by Internet

This is yet another pointer to the fact that blogs are positioned nicely to be an income earner – the big challenge is to find advertising tools that help turn potential advertisers in the direction of Bloggers as well as more established web sites.

Google Page Rank Update

There is a lot of talk around the web at the moment about Google’s current page ranking update. You may have already noticed your blog’s page rank change – most of my blogs are pretty stable although I’ve noticed one of the new ones has gone up from 2 to 6 which was a nice surprise.

Much of the discussion in forums has been by worried bloggers and webmasters whose page rank has decreased and therefore are losing substantial traffic. Dropping down a ranking can mean the difference between a top ten result on Google and a top 100 result.

Jim Hedger is writing over at WebProNews about the page rank change with Google and writes:

‘ Most webmasters will remember last year’s Florida Update which turned Google’s rankings upside down for about eight weeks. That eight week period caused a great deal of turmoil for SEOs, small businesses and web masters. The Florida Update was introduced on November 15, just six weeks before Christmas and at the start of the most important season for retailers. If Google does update it’s algorithm in the next few weeks, another sudden round of “placement dislocation” may occur thus frustrating online retailers desperate for online Christmas sales. While it is impossible to predict such an update with 100% accuracy, there are a number of simple steps webmasters and SEOs can take to protect their clients in the case of a major update.’

Creative Weblogging – Paying for Content

Creative Weblogging is offering to pay bloggers $5 for sending in an article to their growing network of blogs. Creative Weblogging is developing a similar blogging network to that of Weblogs Inc with an interesting array of blogs.

Obviously they’ve done their sums and worked out that in the long run they can make more than $5 per post on certain topics – interesting.

Yahoo to launch Overture ads in RSS!!!

The RSS Weblog has just broken the news that Yahoo’s Overture (main competitor to Adsense) will be shortly supporting ads in RSS feeds. This is pretty significant news for those of us running contextual ads on our blogs – but only for those using Overture. The question on everyone’s lips now is if and when Google will follow in Overture’s footsteps and introduce such a system.

A number of options for advertising in your RSS feed already exist but I have to say that I’ve not seen anything that works terribly well yet. Most of the ads are rather annoying and stick out like sore thumbs. We’ll follow this story with interest.

RSS Syndication Made Simple – Finding Content Made Easy

Steve Rubel (one of my newest favorite reads) has a very useful post on RSS Syndication Made Simple. It is one of the best and easiest to follow, descriptions of how to use RSS to find and read content of other bloggers and news sources.

Steve writes – ‘RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication. It is a new technology standard that enables any online publisher (corporate, blogger, media, etc.) to broadcast information onto the Internet in “feeds.” Users can elect to subscribe to as many feeds as they want and view them all at once or individually using one or more different RSS readers, or news aggregators. Such readers include high-end dedicated desktop software applications, mobile devices and increasingly sophisticated Web-based applications. No matter which aggregator you choose, you get the same great benefits: 1) you are alerted to new content from your favorite sites as soon as it hits the web and 2) you can aggregate all your favorite sources of information together and peruse them on one page.’

95% of what I write in my blogs I find through RSS – following specific blogs and using news alerts targeting keywords that my blogs are interested in. Every morning I wake up to a fresh stock of starting points for my days research and postings.

Within minutes of a news article or blog post hitting the internet I can know about it and be posting a link, quote or comment on my own blog responding to what is happening.

So if you’re not using RSS to find content for your blog you’re probably giving yourself a whole heap of work that you don’t need to go through each day – head over to RSS Syndication Made Simple and take a load off!

3 New Adsense Features Being Tested

Adsense may be testing some new features – I just stumbled upon a site that seems to be being used as a testbed for the new stuff. This is a page I first noticed two ads per page on – about a month before it became public that the rest of us could do that. I notice three new features so far:

1. Little dividers between the ads on the skyscraper site. It breaks it up a little and is a little different.

2. Change to Ads About Option – Also I just noticed that this particular user has another option at the bottom of their ads that says:

“Change to Ads About:” and then it lists five other related topics to click on. When you click on one of the options the ads change to ones related to the topic at hand.

3. Change to Ads About Search – Also after you click on a couple of ‘change ads’ options a search field comes up that says:

“Change to Ads About:”

This allows you to type in a request for ads about any particular topic!

So it seems Adsense are testing a feature that lets our readers choose their own topics for ads! Interesting. I’m not sure how many of my readers would take the time to toggle the ads. But this feature would be useful for ME if I could have a little more control over the ads my users see on particular pages – which I’m not seeing as an option.

Has anyone else seen these options on sites?

Keywords or Keyword Phrases? Effective SEO Strategy

About.com asks the question – should those wanting to optimize their site target single keywords or keyword phrases?



“Consider the keyword “cars.” A quick search for this phrase at Google reveals nearly 20 million web sites competing for a ranking for this phrase. Since studies show that few consumers make it past the first few pages of search results, that means that all but about 30 of these web sites are unlikely to see any traffic from this phrase.

Apart from the fact that even the most skilled SEOs would be hard pressed to earn top rankings on this keyword, it’s also not a very targeted phrase to optimize for. Will the searcher who types “cars” be looking for pictures of cars? Car sales? Car events? New Cars? Old Cars? The list could go on and on.

Web surfers tend to learn very quickly that in order to find what they are looking for, they need to target their search queries more carefully. So…get specific with your keywords.”



Read more at SEO 101 – Beginner’s Guide to Keyword Research