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The Impact of Blogs on PR

Steve from Micro Persuasion has kindly posted a presentation he did on the Impact of Blogs on PR. It is a well thought out presentation that covers the basics through to some good conclusions on the topic – complete with powerpoint slides and audio.

‘Bloggers are the leading force of change here. A blog is basically a web site owned by an individual or group that’s written with a human voice. They are easily discovered, usually organized chronologically, and written by people you can reach out and touch. It’s this last point – the social nature of blogs – that differentiates them from more staid corporate web sites.’

Read more at Micro Persuasion: Presentation on the Impact of Blogs on PR

BloggerCon – Making Money with Your Blog

Doc Searls has an interesting post on making money with blogs in preparation for a session on the topic at the next Blogger Con. He asks a lot of thought provoking questions and then puts forward an interesting case…

‘As you can see, I have a position here. I believe it’s far more important (and interesting) to make money because of our blogs, rather than with them; just as we make money because we have phones rather than with our phones.

There are exceptions. Some of us make money by selling on the phone. If that’s you, think about what trying to sell over your blog (instead of the phone) would do to your relationships with readers.

Of course, lots of people use advertising to defray the costs of blogging. And, to be frank, I really don’t care much if you have advertising on your blog, or if you make money that way. If that makes you happy, or makes you money, fine. I expect we’ll spend some time comparing various advertising options. But let’s also ask, How interesting is that, once you’re past describing whatever it takes to get going with Adsense or Blogads? It’s cool that they provide a service and an income stream. But I’d like to see us budget time for each of the potential topics we can cover.’

Read more at BloggerCon – Making Money Session

Blogs and Newspapers – Command Post

The Command Post did a talk to editors of Associate Press newspapers recently and put the content of what he said up online – its well worth the read.



‘Here’s the lesson from Command Post: information in general, and news in particular, is now a flow, and not a stock.

Before the internet, information was governed by set distribution channels and gatekeepers … brokers … who decided who was able to have what. The stock broker had the price. The real estate agent had the prior housing report. The car salesman had your credit report.

And in news, the journalists had the facts, and the editors acted as brokers, making choices about what would be reported and what wouldn’t.

Not the case now. The Internet hates brokers. It KILLS brokers. Now, because of the Internet, everyone with a computer, an email address and a browser is a point of distribution … the only thing needed for information to “get out” is an interest on the part of one person to supply it, and a demand on the part of another person to have it.

When you have a billion people connected to each other, there is a supply and a demand for everything … and when you have search engines like Google, they actually have the ability to find each other.’

Read more at The Command Post – The Publisher’s Desk – Full Text Of My Speech To AP Managing Editors

Corporate Bloggers

Sifry is writing about Corporate Blogger today – he numbers them as 5000:



‘These are people who blog in an official or semi-official capacity at a company, or are so affiliated with the company where they work that even though they are not officially spokespeople for the company, they are clearly affiliated. For example, the folks in SAP’s developers program get blogs if they want them, and are available to anyone who joins the (free) SAP developers network. This group also includes folks at Sun Microsystems and at Microsoft, where employees are actively encouraged to blog.’



Read more at Sifry’s Alerts: Corporate Bloggers

The other posts in this series of posts are also worth reading – at State/Size of the BlogosphereGrowth of the BlogosphereBig Media vs Blogs.

Do you have time to be a ProBlogger?

I’m currently taking a bit of a working holiday in New Zealand and am spending a few days with two fellow bloggers to talk about the possibilities of working together as a blogging collective. One of the things I’ve found myself thinking on a number of occasions over the last few days is that it takes time to build a blogging business.

This morning I had an email from a reader of this site telling me that they want to earn money from blogging and they want to earn it fast.

In writing this blog I do not want to create any false impressions that blogs are a silver bullet – that all you have to do is start one, add some ads and then you’ll be set for life with a nice passive income.

[Read more...]

Micropayments and Blogging

When I was in my first year of high school I met a guy who would change my life – ok he didn’t really change it, but he taught me a lesson which I still use today in my pro-blogging. He taught me that if you aim small you can actually make it big! Indulge me if you will as I reminisce about my friend Trent.

My most vivid memory of Trent is in an Aussie Fish and Chip shop. For some reason our class was out on a field trip on this particular day and our teacher had taken us to a Fish and Chip shop to get some lunch. We’d all been told to bring a $2 – $3 dollars to get our lunch but as usual Trent hadn’t brought any money.

Trent wasn’t the most organized person in the world and I suspect money wasn’t flowing at home and so he’d developed this wonderful skill to get by when he needed money in such situations as this.

He waited until everyone else in the class had ordered and paid for their fish and chips and then he proceeded to move around my class mates asking if they could spare a few cents. He did it in a funny/clownish kind of way and made most of us laugh in the process. Most people gave him a few cents, no one gave him more than 20 – but when he’d finished his rounds of classmates and fellow customers and the time came to order Trent proceeded to the counter and placed an order that made the rest of us look like we were just having snacks. He’d collected $3.50 – more than enough for lunch – and probably a snack on the way home after school.

None of Trent’s classmates really minded about his good fortune – after all it hadn’t really cost us much – but when added all together our spare change was significant in Trent’s eyes. Trent was ahead of his times – a forerunner in the Micro-Payments industry.

The theory is simple – get enough people to give you a small payment and you’ll earn a significant income.

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Blog Advertising – Fear and Ignorance Keep Media Buyers Away

Advertisers including Paramount Pictures, The Wall Street Journal, and The Gap are successfully reaching niche audiences for a fraction of the cost of traditional advertising and a handful of bloggers are earning six-figure incomes from their blogs. Why aren’t more advertisers and bloggers getting together? Fear, ignorance and the knowledge that a lot of pioneers got shot.

With clickthrough rates in traditional online advertising dropping, inexpensive blog clickthroughs are as high as 5 percent. Blogs provide advertisers an excellent opportunity to reach a devoted audience niche for as little as $10 a week. Already, blogs like DailyKos which receives 15 million page views a month, get $9,000 a week for advertising and is sold out for weeks in advance.

Advertising on blogs is not like buying a minute on the Super Bowl says Henry Copeland, founder of Blogads, which matches advertisers with blogs. Successful blogs are edgy, have a sense of humor, and are recognized experts in a narrow niche. Blog audiences look at traditional ads, like “Click here, get 20% off,” and say “screw this, I’ve seen it everywhere,” Copeland says.’ Read more at Blogs are a Good Buy for Advertisers but Fear and Ignorance Keep Media Buyers Away

Article Swapping

Wayne over at Blog Business World has a good article on Article Swapping as a strategy to increase the content on your blog. If you can ensure the quality of your article swapping partners this is a good strategy that can double your article producing power and therefor quantity of content on your page. He writes:

Adding new visitor traffic to your website is always a challenge. Finding fresh and innovative promotional techniques is often as difficult as creating fresh content.

Wait a minute! Why not accomplish both goals at the same time? By working with your current link exchange partners, and other website owners with businesses that complement yours, both goals are achievable.

Every website requires new content to provide interesting information for your site visitors. The same old stale articles won’t bring in much in the way of return traffic.

The various search engines give extra credit for site freshness and incoming links. Every article you provide to other webmasters provides them with new content. It provides your site with a themed incoming link. The same holds true for guest articles hosted on your site.

The level of my blogging earnings are directly related to the number of pages on my blogs (of course there are many other factors but quantity is a significant factor). Therefor one strategy for increasing earnings is obviously more pages as I’ve written about in my Generating Quantity of Content series.

Street Talk

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Street Talk is another blog with an income stream that uses the Adsense program. It is a little different to other blogs that we’ve featured here in that instead of focusing upon products it focuses upon a popular New Zealand Television show – Shortland Street.

The site is currently in beta and will no doubt add more features and advertising opportunities – it will no doubt be a popular site for private advertisers which will be drawn to the site as traffic levels build – which they will if it goes in the same direction as another NZ fan blog that the owners of Street Talk own – Idolblog which focusses upon the New Zealand Idol and Australian Idol shows (ala ‘Pop Idol’ (UK) and ‘American Idol’ (US)). Idolblog has been a massive success for its developers generating a frenzy of activity every week before during and after episodes of the popular shows.

The beauty of these sites is that they are highly targeted on geographic areas and they will appeal to private advertisers from those locations.