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How to Generate Massive Traffic, Excitement, and Even Jealousy with a Hollywood-Style Launch Trailer

This guest post is by Jon Morrow of boostblogtraffic.com.

You know that feeling you have when you’re onto something big?

Your heart is thump, thump, thumping, your mind races down the roads of future possibilities, and you drift through the day with strange grin plastered on your face, like someone shot you up with happy juice, and you’ve yet to come down. It’s a wonderful place to be, and if you’d come looking for me on October 7, 2011, it’s exactly where you would’ve found me.

Seven days into the launch for my new blog, I already had 1,740 email subscribers. I’d picked up over 1,000 new twitter followers, hundreds of whom were enthusiastically gabbing about me to all their friends. I also had 673 likes and dozens of comments on a new Facebook fan page.

Oh, and did I mention I didn’t write a single blog post?

It’s true. My blog consisted of two pages, a video, and over 200 comments from readers who were so excited they could barely sit still.

What’s more, a half-dozen A-list bloggers sent me the direct messages on Twitter, telling me how impressed they were. One of them even said he was jealous. I was shocked. My baby blog was only seven days old, and already people were envious.

Sounds impossible, right?

Normally, it is. For many bloggers, getting traffic and respect is an incremental process, built one blog post at a time over a period of months or years.

It takes patience. It takes perseverance. It takes lots and lots of hard work.

But what if it didn’t have to be that way?

What if you go from a nobody to the center of attention in your industry in a matter of weeks?

What if you could become an authority without writing a single word?

What if you could get hundreds or even thousands of people talking about you, generating a massive tidal wave of traffic that carries you for years to come?

In our world, it’s unheard of. Blogs just aren’t built that way.

So, to learn how, I had to visit another world, a world inhabited by the brilliant and the beautiful, a world where billions of dollars are won or lost based solely on the strength of an idea, a world where nobodies transforming into superstars isn’t just normal but routine.

What is this strange place?

Chances are, you’ve probably heard of it.

It’s called Hollywood.

The Hollywood guide to blog promotion

At the movies

Copyright itestro - Fotolia.com

Have you ever really paid attention to the way Hollywood creates blockbuster movies?

Yes, they spend gazillions of dollars on advertising. Yes,
they have an opening night where the cast turns out in all their glitz and glamour for a showing of their film to the Who’s Who of the movie biz. Yes, they have an army of crackerjack marketers creating special promotions, building strategic alliances, and merchandising everything imaginable.

But it all starts with a trailer. Editors chop two or three hours of film into a 30-150 second spot designed to leave you spellbound and begging for more.

And the stakes are high.

A good trailer gets millions of people excited about seeing the film, where a bad one confuses, or worse, bores viewers into believing the film will suck. A good trailer captures the attention of the media and creates a blitz of free publicity, where a bad one is ignored or even made fun of. A good trailer is the starting gun for a blockbuster movie that rakes in hundreds of millions of dollars, where a bad one is a bullet to the brain of a project doomed from the start.

Good or bad though, every movie has one, and that’s because people need them. Nobody wants to go into a movie having no idea what it’s about. They need you to condense it down for them. They need to make it easy to decide. And so they give you 30-150 seconds to do it.

In the movie business, it’s accepted, but I couldn’t help thinking…

What if it’s true for other media too?

If you’ve ever looked at the percentage of new visitors who subscribe to your blog, you’ve probably been shocked by how abysmal it is.

The average blogger only gets 1-2% of new users to subscribe, and even the rock stars who do everything perfectly only get about 5%.  To improve the percentage, there are several things you can do, like creating landing pages, offering incentives, or installing pop-up reminders to subscribe, but there’s only so far you can go.

Here’s why:

You’re making it too difficult to decide.

Visitors have to figure out what your blog is about, they have to read your content, and they have to decide whether or not it’s interesting to them. The whole process takes ten minutes or more, and that’s too long. The truth is, Hollywood has figured it out: you only have 30-150 seconds, and after that, they’re gone.

So how can you make the whole process shorter?

Well, you can’t. The problem is, you’re asking people to watch the movie before they see the trailer, and most of them decide it’s not worth the trouble.

To make it work, you really need to reengineer the process from the ground up. And that’s exactly what I decided to do.

How I got 1,740 subscribers in seven days

When I launched Boost Blog Traffic, I built my whole strategy on an insane idea:

In the beginning, the best way to get subscribers is to publish nothing.

No blog posts. No podcasts. No content at all.

Instead, I would offer a short video trailer, very similar to what Hollywood releases for movies. I would give visitors the bare minimum they need to subscribe. I would spend several months promoting the trailer before writing a single blog post.
Pretty much the same way Hollywood does it.

If you look at the trailer, you’ll see Hollywood’s fingerprints there too. It has dramatic music. It has slick animation. It has shamelessly over-the-top quotes from social media big shots.

And then it asks for a decision:

Will you subscribe, or will you leave?

A lot of people resist asking that question, because the answer is scary. What if they decide to leave? What if you end up with nothing? What if everybody thinks you’re an idiot?

I wish I had some comforting truism to offer in response, but the truth is, it happens. You could fail. But what’s worse: finding out your idea sucks after only a couple of weeks or waiting three years before you finally face the facts?

Personally, I’d rather do it fast. Rip off the Band-Aid, have a good cry, and then get back to business.

If it works, it’s worth it. If it doesn’t, it’s still worth it, because you learned some valuable lessons without paying too high a price.

But this whole idea of starting slow and waiting for things to snowball?

It’s silly. You’ll wait months or even years to find out if your idea is going to work.

A far better approach is to put up a simple website, release a snazzy trailer, promote the hell out of it for a few weeks, and see if you can talk anyone into signing up. If you can, you’ve got a winner, and if you can’t, cut your losses as quick as you can.

Here’s why:

You either go big or go home

Some people are going to get pissed at me for saying this, but I believe the blogosphere is changing.

Gone are the days where anybody can build a successful blog. Gone are the days where you can start writing and expect anyone to pay attention. Gone are the days where you can tinker around with it on your lunch hour and expect it to become a full-time career.

The new rule is, “Go big, or go home.”

To be successful, you need big talent. To be successful, you need big connections. To be successful, you need a big launch event that makes everyone sit up and pay attention.

You can be releasing a movie, a blog, a book, or whatever. It doesn’t matter. Regardless of the media, the rules are the same.

If you want to be big, start big.

Launching your blog with a trailer is one way to do that. It creates buzz, excitement, maybe even a little jealousy, because let’s face it, putting together a Hollywood-style trailer is hard.

If you’re wondering about the technicalities of how to do it, I’ll tell you everything you need to know next week. In the meantime, go watch the trailer, study how the subscription process works, and then copy it.

Nobody gets bonus points for originality. Success is about doing what works, period, full stop.

And by getting 1,740 subscribers in seven days, I’d say it works pretty well. So give it a shot.

We’ll talk more next week.

Jon Morrow is also on a mission to help good writers get traffic they deserve. If you’re one of them, check out his upcoming blog about (surprise!) blogging.

About Guest Blogger

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Comments

  1. Akil says:

    Hi Jon,

    Great post I completely agree with your concept and taking the Hollywood approach to blogging is unique to a point. I am reading a similar book that talks about looking to other industries for idea to implement into your blog or the blogworld.

    Too often times some blogger only look within the blogosphere to copy ideas but as a business we mush look outside and bring in new fresh aka purple cow ideas to get different results.

    If you keep doing the same thing you will get the same results. Its time we look outside of the blogging world and come up with alternative solution to getting our business, blog, brand outside to the world.

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Yep, creative adaptation is going to become increasingly more important. Blogs are becoming a mature media, and so we all need to start learning from other mature media and implementing the lessons.

  2. Okay, you got me. I’m hooked. I want to know how to create a “Pay Attention to ME” trailer like yours that inspires action. In my case, I have a blog and now a book. And I’m out to sell the heck out of my book – LOVE IN THE TIME OF FORECLOSURE and bring new readers to my blog of the same name. Above all, I am out to make a difference for people who have been hit hard by the economic crisis and in order to do that, I need to expand my reach.

    We (my publisher – Outpost19 – and me) talked about book trailers in the beginning. But we had such a tight deadline to have it all come together that we decided to focus on other things. So now I’m wondering… is it possible to create a post-launch “trailer”? Why not?

    I’ll be following you to learn how you created your trailer next week. Can’t wait!

    Stephanie Walker
    -Author, “Love in the Time of Foreclosure”
    @littof

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Yeah, trailers are great for launching books. I think Tim Ferris did one that went viral for 4-hour body.

      And sure, you can do one post-launch. It may not be as effective, because it’s not building anticipation, but it’s still a good strategy. You can also do a relaunch for new editions of the book.

  3. Naveen says:

    After reading your good post, I am starting of making a trailer to my blog as well. Thanks for the motivation.

  4. the trailer is just awesome. inspirational!

  5. What are best methods of dissemination for this video?

    Also, should it be used on the opt-in page do you think?

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Retweet buttons are good for spreading the word. Also, email a link to the trailer to the authorities in your niche, explain your launch, and ask if they would mind tweeting it for you.

      And yes, I think this strategy works best on opt in pages. The primary reason for doing it is to build your email list.

  6. Could you provide a source for further information?

  7. Henneke says:

    Great post! I’ve been on your launch list since 22 October and can’t wait to see your blog go live. I admire how you dare to be different and implement a brave strategy.

    If you start small
    your efforts are low
    you can’t really fail
    because you never really started

    It’s scary to start big
    because efforts are huge
    and expectations are high
    and failure is a real possibility

  8. paul wolfe says:

    Jon

    That’s a really interesting take on setting up and starting a blog. I think it can be extended to other places as well – I’m going to try it somewhere and see what the results are. (If they are any good I’ll drop you an email and let you know where I posted it and what kind of results it gave me).

    For your future posts I’d guess these are the kind of questions people will want to ask?

    1. How did you get the cool animated sequences (I’m guessing After Effects?)
    2. Did you outsource that or did you create those sequences yourself?
    3. Where did you get your music from?
    4. What kind of scripting/copywriting process did you go through?

    and so on. When do you actually ‘get started?’

    Paul

  9. Saif Afridi says:

    Extremely Effective and Creative Way of Launching a Blog.

  10. The fact of the matter is you have to write a Guest Post even to promote your trailer and ultimately, your blog . In case of movies, it is entirely different way of handling things and they spend a huge amount of money for publicizing the movie with the help of trailers or posters or whatever. The credit of this innovation cannot be taken away from you and I appreciate the novelty. Blogs will always be weighed on the basis of its content quality & depth.

    • Jon Morrow says:

      That’s true. While the trailer itself does get some word-of-mouth traffic, it’s essential you promote it, and guest posts are a great way to do it.

  11. Jon, fantastic post, and it’s got me thinking about utilizing this approach for an upcoming project myself. However I can’t help but think that the glowing endorsements of heavy hitters such as Brian Clark and Darren Rowse that kick off your trailer had as much if not more of an impact in your early reach and conversion metrics. While I think this approach is potentially a great alternative, most of us that don’t have the luxury of such endorsements will most likely experience results far less then what you have and need to establish realistic baseline metrics to determine go/no go.

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Well, that’s true, to some extent. If you’re just getting started, it’s probably not realistic to expect 1000 subscribers in a week. 100 might be a good goal, though, and that’s still a lot more than most beginning blocks pick up in a week.

      But also, think about what you can do to get those endorsements. A lot of bloggers would disagree with me about this, but I don’t believe popular bloggers are self made. They are appointed. Getting endorsements like that really aren’t optional. If you want to be successful, they are a requirement, and so getting that needs to be a part of your strategy from day one.

  12. Tim Moon says:

    Hey there, great video! Which blog did you get so many subscribers and twitter followers from? ‘Cause YouTube says the video on the site you’ve linked to here has only received 179 views. That’s roughly what…100 subscribers per 1 view. Did you change videos?

    I like the video concept. It’s actually been pretty widely used for books, especially by independent authors, and it seems to help a bit. I plan to use the tactic as well. Good tips Jon and best of luck w/ Boost Blog Traffic!

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Yeah, the numbers on YouTube must be wrong. According to my local stats, it’s been viewed over 10,000 times now.

      A lot of that traffic is word-of-mouth, but I’ve also written guest posts like this one to promote it. And I’m lucky to have quite a few friends with large followings. They’ve helped promote it too.

  13. Nicole Eliza says:

    Thank you for this post! I had never thought about doing something so extreme for a blog! I have thought about doing this kind of a marketing ploy for an event, but never for a blog! Thanks for the enthusiasm of the unknown. Sometimes that is all a person truly needs to get excited about something, I mean look at Apple! Who would have thought that a date, could be just as powerful?

  14. Rita says:

    Interesting concept. Keep us posted on how you’re doing.

    Rita blogging at The Survive and Thrive Boomer Guide

  15. That is one very creative idea. I would never have dreamed of doing something like this. I am always fascinated by how people get things to go viral.

    Great work

  16. Elja Trum says:

    You had me interested to go and watch your trailer, but it doesn’t show on my iPhone. Perhaps something to improve upon?

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Unfortunately, we have Apple to blame. They’ve purposefully made the iPad and iPhone incompatible with flash video, and as of yet, there’s not really a good replacement.

      • Bob Angus says:

        I recommend asking for a version in an mp4 or mov format. It’s usually just a “save as” for the producer. Then you can upload to YouTube or other service which can be viewed on an iOS device.

        Or better yet, build an mobile version of the landing page with that version embedded. That way you get view and the subscription whenever they are engaged, now including on the phone or tablet. Think moviefone or imdb mobile, but just one trailer video on one mobile landing page for your one product.

        You could even start using other mobile traffic generating campaigns for an even bigger boost. QR codes are incredibly effective.

      • Mobile Rik says:

        Doing video on mobile has been a frustrating experience overall with all the compatibility issues. But what works just fine with Apple mobile devices is *YouTube*. I used to try fiddling with all sorts of embedding contingencies (MP4, SWF, MOV, etc…), but once I realized YouTube takes care of all the compatibility issue, everything changed. Now it’s a nobrainer — On every mobile site I build, I just grab the YouTube embed code, and it seems to work as well as you can expect it to. :)

  17. Hi Jon,
    The moment I read “This guest post is by Jon Morrow” I was wondering where I had heard that name before. After a few seconds, I got a few of my brain cells working and I remember that I first heard about you from the BlogCastFM. The interview with Srini was truly awesome and I learned a lot!

    Anyways, I watched the trailer (via the link here) and subscribed ahem.. So basically I had intent to subscribe even before I watched the trailer!
    Which actually brings to my next point.
    * you have to be a “celebrity” to get a greater outcome with “the Hollywood-Style Launch”

    Meaning.. the already built reader base, credibility, authority and not to mention the testimonials from pro bloggers would definitely contribute towards subscription rates.

    Do you have any advice on how “non-celebrities” can use this approach? ;-)

    Thanks
    Shamelle

  18. Ardorm says:

    Jon, you are perfectly skilled at getting attention. :)

    But “Get big or go home”, well, that is so Wrong!!! Are you sure your content is super-professional to bet that high? What if people do not like your site? I mean right now you have to give people something extraordinary, something new… something that is Nowhere to Find.

    What about the basic rule of the life “Stay in the Golden Middle”? All famous people didn’t get their success in a day. It took years for them to develop their skill. Hard work isn’t a curse, it is a blessing. In order to be successful you have to learn also how to stay successful.

    I just so hope you didn’t promise more than you could give, seriously.

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Yes, success does take years of road work, but you still need to go big. Again and again and again. Even if you fail a few times, keep swinging hard. That’s how you transcend mediocrity and become great.

  19. Rania says:

    Great post! Very inspiring! One that is important too is to fulfill what we’ve already promoted/promised on our blog’s ‘trailer’.

  20. shira says:

    Let’s break this down – you too could get 1,700+ sign-ups before you start your first post, if you:
    1. Already have a huge reputation in blogging (reputation)
    2. Have testimonials from every major blogging blog (social proof)
    3. Make a video highlighting those testimonials (product)
    4. Promote said video for 7 months before releasing said blog (promotion)

    Lovely. How very helpful.

    Thank you,
    -s

    • Jon Morrow says:

      I’m guessing that’s sarcasm, yes? But actually, I think going through those steps in order is a much more effective strategy than what most people do.

    • Sonia Simone says:

      Shira, you can reproduce these for yourself — like Jon did (and Darren did, and Brian Clark did, etc.) You start from where you are and build on it. So you build that reputation, approach some bloggers who have a bit of an audience for testimonials, maybe put a video together using the tools you may already have, and promote what you’ve got as well as you can.

      None of us has been doing this for 20 years. You’d be amazed at what you’ll be able to build just this year, if you work on it.

      Fortunately, successful blogging is a *lot* easier to break into than Hollywood.

  21. Hi Jon,
    That is awesome news. I never thought of the trailer aspect but I will have to implement it someday.

  22. Gina Reedy says:

    Where did you order a trailer? I know there are some on fiverr for just 5 bucks. Is that what you mean?

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Well, to get one of these done costs a lot more than five dollars. More like $500, minimum. I’ll go through it step-by-step next week.

  23. Ian Brodie says:

    I like the trailer Jon…

    But I can’t help but think…

    The trailer is essentially a sequence of your buddies from copyblogger and problogger saying how great you are.

    Would a trailer for an unknown without those A list recommendations do so well?

    Ian

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Not quite as well, no. Getting 1700 subscribers in one week might be out of reach, but I think anyone could get 100 or so, which is a lot better than most beginning bloggers do. :-)

      Also, getting those A-list recommendations is something you should be working toward. If you want to be a successful blogger, getting endorsed by the authorities in your niche isn’t really optional.

    • Sonia Simone says:

      If it would have done as well, he wouldn’t have done it that way. :)

      He has buddies on Copyblogger because he’s sent us a ton of great content. That’s a reproducible strategy.

  24. Josh Sarz says:

    So Jon, when are you going to actually start the blog? Or are you making it to be social proof of how guest blogging really does do miracles for a blog, even one without any content or posts. :)

    Basing on the numbers, and my personal reaction to your video a couple of months ago, it worked insanely great.

    Hope to work with you soon, when I can afford the course, that is. Heh

  25. Guy Hogan says:

    Very bold. I can see why it would work. It’s one of the reasons why flash fiction works. I publish a blog about flash fiction.

  26. Brandy says:

    Great points here. Enjoyed reading this and love the idea of the trailer effect on blogs!

  27. Mary Allen says:

    Confusing Trailer. Not enough time to read the comments/quotes.

    • Jon Morrow says:

      It is a bit fast. I wanted to slow it down, but unfortunately, it’s difficult to do with the way the animation works. Fortunately, most folks have been able to read it, so it’s worked well.

  28. Paul Jun says:

    Jon continues to pioneer and change the field of blogging.

    I am a real example (and not just saying this) of how effective his method of teaching is.

    Not only did he mirror my struggles and confusion in this craft: he broke it down in a such a way that allowed me to explore my talents in writing and blogging.

    Jon is the epitome of remarkable, and his classes not only teach you how to be successful, but the lessons and advice he shares can be exercised in everyday life.

  29. Adi Gaskell says:

    So how many of those have you converted into regular readers? Suffice to say when expectations are built up in such a way the ‘product’ people get at the end has to be good enough to fulfil those expectations or people will leave very quickly.

    BTW, YouTube is still showing just 216 views of the video. I run a channel with over 50,000 views, and their counters aren’t minute by minute accurate, but do generally catch up, so to be showing low hundreds when you suggest 10,000+ suggests something is wrong somewhere. No comments left on the YT video either.

    Not wishing to poo poo your hype, but the key on the web is building something of long-term value. That’s the proof of the pudding.

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Well, the blog isn’t technically launched yet, so I don’t have any regular readers. But it’s up around email 3000 subscribers now.

      Not sure what’s going on with YouTube. It’s view count is wrong.

      Maybe it’s because I’m using a different player, not the default YouTube one.

  30. Ian says:

    Brilliant concept. Love it.

    What is the name of the music you used for your trailer? Would love to buy it and more from that artist. Mesmerizing.

    Thanks!

  31. Promoting a new blog via Google optimization, doing all things well and having a lot of luck… is a hard way to have a succesfull blog (even impossible in many cases).
    Do you really think ,hollywood way is affordable for anyone who launches a blog without first-class bloggers behind him?
    There are things out of reason also in blogging tachtics.
    Thanks for explain your method anyway.
    when i went to see video…youtube says it was removed :(
    greetings

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Well, it depends on your definition of affordable. You can get it done for $500, maybe less.

      The video is still showing for me. Might want to check again?

  32. Looks like it may be trailer time. Love this, Jon! Thanks so much for the inspiration.

  33. Hey Jon! I was one of those 1,740 and I also attended your follow-up webinar. I think this post is missing the one thing you attribute most of your success to, relationships.

    I know you’ve put years of hard work into becoming the likable expert that you are. I wonder how many of those 1,740 signed up not because of the trailer but because they knew you and because Copyblogger (and other friends) promoted your site on that day.

    I like the crux of your argument and I hope this post re-frames what it means to launch a blog. If you didn’t have any of those relationships, how would you have gotten that surge of traffic to your trailer and opt-in?

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Yep, relationships are a big part of it. I’ll be talking about that in an upcoming post.

      If I didn’t have those relationships, I would go get them before launching. Building your connections is the first step, forever and always.

  34. Caleb says:

    That “starting slow waiting for things to snowball” always annoyed me inside because too many have proven the opposite and although I know patience is indeed a virtue, I do not believe in waiting when you don’t have to!

    You can only do according to your means, but it is YOU who has to create those means and this is a highly creative means…I’ll be waiting for the followup.

  35. Jon, loved the trailer but let’s be honest, you had me at Darren’s and Brian’s statements. Who wouldn’t sign up?

    But what about those of us who already have an established blog? Testimonials from readers?

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Well, testimonials from readers aren’t bad, but yeah, testimonials from authorities in your niche are better.

      If you already have an established blog, you could do a trailer to launch a new product. You can also organize a relaunch, taking down your blog temporarily and then opening it up and pitching it as “version 2.”

  36. James Greg says:

    Completely a new idea for a blog! I’m sure this would be the first time I’ll be witnessing a grand launch of a blog. So this means the new trend is out now and we should all be doing the same. What do you think we should do it for every new blog post as well?

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Well, no, I wouldn’t do them for every blog post. Putting together a trailer like this is a ton of work, not to mention expensive. You really only need to do them for your big events.

  37. This really helped. I have also started a new blog and m looking for some video clips. have been for a while in fiverr

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Fiverr isn’t really a good place for this type of thing. oDesk is probably your best bet. I’ll be talking about the outsourcing side of it a lot more in my next post.

  38. I discovered that YouTube gives 1:10 ratio in visits. That is, if you had 10,000 views then 1000 people would visit your site. But video (movies) is the most preferable medium in our society today, so creating a stunning trailer like yours is a very natural and logical thing to do.

  39. Watched your trailer and it looks awesome. But I didn’t subscribe yet cos I feel I’m reading more about blogging than actually doing it. Good luck!

  40. Marwan Jamal says:

    Gone are the days where anybody can build a successful blog. Gone are the days where you can start writing and expect anyone to pay attention. Gone are the days where you can tinker around with it on your lunch hour and expect it to become a full-time career………..

    Man, those 3 lines are the best i`ve read since a lot of time, it`s an article that says:”ideas are everywhere people, just work ur brain and get`em”. Good job Jon:)

  41. Skyler Sweet says:

    I appreciate the theory of branding like your a Hollywood.

    Although I feel like this article lacks in a few areas that I’m going to illustrate to help anyone thinking of doing the same.

    First, the only reason why I clicked this post was because I wanted to see the trailer.

    - In my humble opinion it should have been included here in this post.

    After not finding what I came to the post for I was not pleased that I had to leave Problogger and go to your site to see it. (especially in the world of socialmedia/blogger self-helps I knew you were already trying to sell me on your site on your turf, I don’t like being sold to) (im obviously seeking help, I’m not here to increase your click rates unnecessarily)

    Secondly the trailer concept was a neat concept but the execution was lacking in that the testimonials go so fast I found it was too hard to read. An enhanced version would perhaps have the testimonials being spoken by the people who made them, a step further would be footage of the two of you together)

    Here’s something I’d note… be careful of using testimonials or giving testimonials if you are not sure of the follow through. If it fails it could tarnish all parties involved.

    That being said, all press is good press. I’ve already spent time on your blog and a bit of time crafting this comment, so good job because you caused engagement which is an ideal of the whole blogging process. :)

    (i hope this doesn’t sound mean, it’s not my intent to be so)

    Ultimately my curiosity turned into conversion cause I gave you my email. Well played!

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Thanks for the feedback, but yeah, what’s important is it works. If I included the trailer here, I would have about 200 subscribers less than I do now.

  42. Ann says:

    Yes with newspaper and magazine sales collapsing globally, its blogs that are thriving

  43. Don’t have an intent to disrespect or so, but I wonder how could you get that number of subscribers, while your video trailers is only watched 267 times as I’m writing this comment. Mostly on boostblogtraffic.com by 172 views. Is it possible to gain more subscribers from referrals or other methods that will be able to multiply the result about 10x than the times the video watched?

    • Jon Morrow says:

      Check the above comments. I’m not using the YouTube player, so it’s not tracking the views on my site. It’s actually been watched more than 10,000 times.

      • Watched 10,000 times, really great, this Hollywood method of press is really brilliant and just works. BTW, this also remind me of Mathew Epstein (googlepleasehire.me), are you inspired by him or already having the same strategy?

  44. Syed Farhan says:

    You said in your previous guest post on ProBlogger:

    “Every day, I get emails from readers who say my posts have changed their thinking. Every day, I get emails from students who say my advice has changed their writing. Every day, I get emails from clients who say my strategies have changed the way they do business.”

    I too want to echo the above words. You changed the way I understood blogging.

    I have a question. How do you post, tweet, share etc when your body below your neck isn’t working?

    • Jon Morrow says:

      I use a program called Dragon NaturallySpeaking. I also have a mouth operated mouse.

      • Syed Farhan says:

        My goodness. I tried to use Dragon once as I wanted to save time but failed badly. It needs a lot of practice.

        You are really inspiring.

  45. mrtom says:

    I would love to read a tutorial how to make such a trailer.

  46. Thanks for the idea; I’m definitely going to use it. Just a couple of questions first:

    1. You’re not in your video. Do you think it’s better to use just the quotes? I’d guess it would be even more interesting if I could see you in it. Or would a combination work?

    2. Your trailer is so effective because of the a-list blogger’s quotes. Do you have any suggestions to people who don’t know any well known people?

    Will you cover these questions in your next post?

    • Jon Morrow says:

      To answer your questions:

      1. Yes, it could work, but it’s substantially harder to do well. It would probably double the time required to make video.

      2. If you don’t know a list bloggers, you need to get to know them. This isn’t optional.

  47. VeehCirra says:

    Wow,Jon why do you come up with all these genius ideas?

    You are a game changer for sure! Can’t wait for your blog to finally go live!