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Travel Blogging

MoiToday is day 12 in the 12 days of Christmas Series – but it’s not over yet (it looks like it’ll be a 15 days of Christmas series instead. Today Melissa Petri shares with us about Travel Blogging. I’ll let her introduce herself.

My name is Melissa Petri and I write Europe String – Travelling Europe on a Budget. Architecture may have been my initial vocation but I have earned my PhD in packing light and choosing the best hotels through years of practice. I am an expatriate in Germany; and count the USA, Hong Kong, China and Korea in my adoptive land list. Now that I have grown roots in Frankfurt, I have yet to give up my semi-nomadic life as I continue to traipse around the world for business and leisure.

Since I am perpetually on the go, you can expect Europe String updates to be researched first-hand. I have been known to go inside restaurants to interrogate the staff. I have also been known to listen to other tourists in cafes, trying to glean more insider information from unsuspecting yet reliable travel resources. Chutzpah and wanderlust go hand-in-hand to fill my head with information to share. Different travel information which are shared with 2 other travel blogs, are the by-products. Over at Escape Blog, I make sure that readers know that “getting there is only part of the equation, making sure you don’t piss off the locals is where the excitement begins.” And at Flyaway-Weblog, readers are informed about the current deals and the ins and outs of travelling.

Yes, I regularly write for 3 travel blogs. Note that when travelling, you will NEVER be worried about blogger’s block. A day’s worth of experience is blog fodder enough for the whole week. There are so many things to discuss that you will find yourself with even more information long after you have gone back home and started working on your desk.

What exactly can you write about?

  • Talk about that time you had when you got lost — which tram you took, what you saw while you were trying to find your way back, how the locals helped when you asked around or write a nifty how-to NOT get lost in, say, Vienna.
  • You can always write a pseudo-food blog. Take pictures, gush about the local cuisine, analyze the taste and recipe if you are foodie or recommend that kitschy little place next to the train station.
  • When you go out to have a pint with that fellow backpacker from Ireland, you can write about the experiences that he shared with you and compare it with your own.
  • For most women, a trip is never complete without going shopping. Share your haggling experiences, the price – how cheap or how expensive one city is and how you were able to find that perfect little trinket for your mom.
  • Write about that budget airline experience. Share your thoughts if the price you paid is worth the comforts that you have given up. Let the truth out, whether you’d recommend it or not.
  • Homesickness. You can write about being away from your loved ones, how you keep in touch with them. And in the process, you can even recommend that internet café across your hostel which served fantastic latte macchiato.

There is so much more you can share. The important thing is to observe your surroundings inasmuch as you should examine your own reactions to these new experiences.

Problem is, you may have so much to blog about but no time to blog, what should you do?

  • Drip your posts. That one day when you are able to spend a bit of time in an internet café, write. A lot. And instead of writing one long entry listing everything that you have seen and experienced, divide each experience into different posts. Assign different dates each day for each post to make sure that one is automatically published daily.
  • If your blogging system does not have the future publish option, post an “I’ll be travelling for #days and I will not be available until…” You can update your blog upon your return.
  • Invite people to guest blog.

With travel blogging, you can share so much information to those who may be travelling in the future. It will also help you remember that journey you took. And most importantly, a travel blog is a great way to keep in touch with those back home. Instead of answering tons of “how was your trip?” emails, you can just point them to your blog.

About Darren Rowse

Darren Rowse is the founder and editor of ProBlogger Blog Tips and Digital Photography School. Learn more about him here and connect with him on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn.

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Comments

  1. brem says:

    You forgot to talk about how to connect to the internet abroad. WiFi borrowing? :-)

    brem

  2. Melissa says:

    haha forgive me but I only had budget travelers in mind… internet cafe is the way to go, baby ;-)

  3. Mauritius says:

    well actually travel blogging is very interesting , you need also to be a travel lover to do this type of blogging even better , travelling removes the stress from someone.

    Travelling is cheap in some destinations while in others they can be very expensive . Like myself i live in Mauritius island which is a touristic island .. it is considered to be rather expensive to travel here ..

    But to spend such an amount to come to Mauritius is worth spending ..

    Mauritius is a country free from pollution , also it is a safe place to be in .. crime does not exist , country is free from hard drugs , and also mauritius has numerous interesting places .. sandy beaches and calm lagoon.

  4. Jakob says:

    You might actually not get a lot of money out of travel blogging, but it’s fun and keeps everyone back home or whereever informed about your experiences.

    In addition, when you come back home you’ll probably see the traffic to your website grow, like it did with my travel blog at http://china.thusgaard.com. Initially http://china.thusgaard.com was made for ourselves and a small group of people. Meanwhile October, November and December have experienced increasing visitors, which just keep increasing in a way that makes me want to start making money on the blog.

    Examples include:
    http://china.thusgaard.com (Mostly English, also Dutch and Danish)
    http://dinekeenrobert.nl (in Dutch)
    http://zumma.dk/blog (Danish)

  5. Melissa says:

    Mauritius: yes, travelling has its rewards.

    Jakob: unless, of course, you hook up with a network and you get paid then, travel blogging pays ;-)

    But, as I am sure you know, travel blogging has its rewards. It’s way more than just to increase visitors or links. Of course, I wouldn’t mind getting those but travel blogging is fun because one gets to reminisce. Talking about my experiences and sharing tips is like doing everything all over again. I feel the same whenever I look at my collection of pictures. I like it.

    Checked out your blog. Love the pictures! I lived in China for 6 months. Love every single experience I had, even the bad ones.

  6. Hsien Lei says:

    Those are some really great concrete tips! Travel blogs are great for expats like us too; a good way to see what a country is like before moving there.

  7. SaschaT says:

    I would like to add a remark to this post . There is website where you can earn money from your travel experience (and other things):

    http://trivago.co.uk

    Talking about “blogging for money” trivago refers more to the “for money” part. You can post your travel experience and photos there, but there is a lot more stuff you can do: adding links, completing hotel information, adding new touristic sites and attractions to the database, writing city/region/country guides – to name only a very few. A complete list would go beyond the scope of this post.

    The bottom line is – if you are interested in travel related topics and want to make money out of it, try trivago. The page is run and maintained in large parts by its community, which is participating in the earnings of the whole platform instead (half of the profit goes to the users).

    I’ve been a member (yes, just a regular member) there since the very start of the platform and I made several hundreds of Euros with it. and they really pay.

    PS: If you want to sign up with some benefit for me, just email me on [email protected]

  8. SaschaT says:

    PPS: For all German speaking readers, the site is also available in German on

    http://www.trivago.de

  9. SaschaT says:

    The link to the UK version of trivago is not complete. The “www” is missing.
    http://www.trivago.co.uk

    Sorry ;-)